Country Living Series

Saturday, October 2, 2010

Pretty pix

Here are some random photos that have been accumulating over the last few days.

Sometimes, when conditions are just right, we get fog rainbows.  The morning fog must be burning off just when the sun is at a certain angle.  I never saw a fog rainbow before moving to Idaho, but we've seen them several times here.

Sun shining through the Virginia creeper leaves.  The fog is the remnant of the fog which formed the rainbow above.

And the last of the fog burns off...

After last week's adventures in pelicans, I noticed a bunch of Canadian geese were using the same reed island.  Must be a popular place!

More field burning.  Looks alarming but it's under control.

The newly-planted wheat field in the setting sun.

Younger Daughter and her friend Miss Calamity having a snack on top the hay bales.

We heard a huge commotion yesterday morning and learned that one of the chickens got into the yard with the dogs.  She made it out but lost a lot of feathers!

When I picked her up (she was huddled behind a pile of boards), she screamed and screamed and screamed.  I thought she'd broken a leg or something, but no - she was just scared.  After a couple of hours she was fine.

Some giganto-mushrooms we found growing in the corral.  Anyone know what type they are?

Here's my visor next to them for a size comparison.

Rotten.  Spoiled rotten.  That's what she is.


  1. Patrice, I think if you'll Bing 'Shaggy Maine' you'll find that's what you have there. Pretty yummy. Double check for regional look-alikes and ask a local, just for safety, but the ones growing on our place get 'et! lol

    We just had a mushroom feast with neighbors last Saturday night. Big field mushrooms and chantrelles...deep-fried, of course. Yes, I'm so bad...but it's a special treat and I fry carefully in good oil. Also had the chive blossoms I'd been saving in the freezer...they'll put onion rings to shame!

    Loved all the ranpix...'cept the poor litta puppity. Oh how I grieve at such animal abuse! lol Poooor litta puppity. Worn out from a hard bout of chicken wrestling?

    The 'picnic' on the hay stack is something you'll look at in 30 years and get tears in your eyes. Precious precious precious.

    A. McSp

  2. Poor chicken
    Lazy dog
    Good girls
    Spooky mushrooms
    Chilly fog
    Smoke-filled sky
    Rosy Virginia Creeper
    Geese on the lake

    Yep, it's autumn.

    Anonymous Patriot

  3. Beautiful pictures!!! I just LOVE this time of year. :)

  4. thanks for sharing your photos . Love the fog rainbow!


  5. I see your dog is as abused and mistreated as mine are. "What? Dinner is 30 seconds late??? I think I'm dyyyyyyyyyyyiiiiinnnnnggggggg..."

  6. I'd be very, VERRRY careful with wild mushrooms! Many mushroom "experts" have died quick and painful deaths from eating poisonous mushrooms, which often resemble non-poisonous mushrooms. I only buy mushrooms from the market, and then usually just the white button variety. I'm not taking any chances, thank you. Loved your pix!

  7. One of my favorite memories of an ex-boss/good friend was when he found these enormous creepy looking mushrooms. He said he was an expert about mushrooms and the natural world in general and we could put our fears aside. So they did eat and were quite happy for an hour or so. About four hours later they were ALL poisoned, not me though. I said I will not eat that crap. The poisoned folk eventually recovered but the trust was gone. Moral of this story is do your own thinking and pay your own price.

  8. I concur with all the posts above urging caution when it comes to eating wild mushrooms, and in fact wild foods of any kind. You have to know what you're doing, because in many cases you'll get no chance to be wrong. And even when you know what you're doing, there can still be surprises.
    For example, someone I know well who has enjoyed Chantrelle mushrooms for years recently became nauseaus and vomitted after eating them, although no one else in the family had any ill effects. The problem? A recent change in one of her blood pressure medications caused an adverse interaction. Fortunately it wasn't serious snd didn't produce any long-lasting damage, but it was a lesson well learned.

    I urge folks to learn what's around them. Many of the things we walk past every day are potentially valuable sources of nutrition if we
    know how to recognize and utilize them. But do your homework, seek out folks with proven local knowledge and I would never ever trust anyonoe who boasts of being an expert. It's not about talking the talk. It's about walking the walk.

    Safety first, last and always.

    A. McSp