Country Living Series

Monday, January 10, 2011

Guest post - Bugging Out to the Country

I have a guest post up on SurvivalMom.com blog called Bugging Out to the Country. Hop on over and take a look.

13 comments:

  1. Excellent article, I just hope people read it and heed it. Many won't read it because they haven't started prepping yet. I wonder how many Americans are prepping? It would be interesting to know, but probably hard to get a reliable number due to opsec.

    How many people are planning on bugging out to your farm, Patrice? I bet you've got some friends and relatives who have approached you about this. It would be hard to say no.

    Anonymous Patriot
    USA

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  2. When I read these sorts of articles, I'm astonished by your (collective) sunny assurance that all you have to do is say, "Sorry, no room at the inn," and the supplicant will go meekly away. Those thousand people in your near town.... You know what? They know how to point a gun and pull a trigger as well as the next entitled and armed screwball (which is pretty much everyone, in general panic mode). Takes no skill at all. (Witness Arizona.) So how are you going to milk the cows, tend the garden? Takes one determined sniper, and 'your' farm is 'his' farm. You'll need to be in hunker-down mode probably for the rest of your lives, since you (collective) all seem to be preparing for a life-or-death survival scenario. Well then, you'd better scrap your Christian scruples and shoot-to-kill everyone who approaches. Whatever 'meat' you can't eat, you can compost. (Or can with your Tatler lids.) Because if it really happens, it's going to be so bad that no 'light' will ever shine again, and brutality will the only god of this world. Think Haiti. And think Darfur. We're in the god-awful situation of knowing that we have to keep barrelling to hell on a road we *know* is disastrous, because if we stop to breathe -- or to cry in panic -- our toxic society will implode and explode at once that much faster. The only 'hope' we have is a worldwide plague, with a minimum mortality of 90%, so that the few survivors in any area will be mindful of, and grateful for, each other, and can live on the pickings of their dead societies for a few generations while they *try* to rebuild a world in which 'kindness', 'courtesy', 'beauty', are not italicized words. And personally, I can't consider a 90% dead world a much better 'hope' than a 100% dead world. Read Wyndham's, 'Day of the Triffids'. You (collective) preppers, with your lists of the munitions and ammo you store -- remind me of the red-haired fellow who tries to coerce the other survivors into fiefdoms, with of course himself (yourselves) as Big Boss(es)! O sad, sad new world. O bleak new world. O desolate new world.

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  3. ROFLOL, anybody who refers to "Day of the Triffids" is not welcome at my retreat. Get a grip, O sad sack. Preppers have a much firmer grip on reality than you apparently do. Stop reading fiction and start reading the headlines.

    Sheesh, where are these people coming from? Is there something in the pot they smoke? (That's a rhetorical question. Of course there is.)

    Anonymous Patriot
    USA

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  4. Well Anon!

    That was quite a manifesto. Let's see if I can address a few of your points and maybe help you to consider a somewhat less dire scenario for us.

    Now, as far as having a sunny disposition - why not? Since the results as you paint them are the same no matter what, why not be happy in our collective delusion? And, delusional as I am, I also have an ultimate backup plan that I suspect you may not have considered; a loving God who will take me and mine home in the end.

    Now as to the specifics of your comment. Patrice's article was written as a lesson for others before bad times, not as a game plan for after. Your fundamental mistake seems to be trying to paint preppers as both paranoid AND naive. See, most of the preparedness types I know understand the concept that "no man is an island". We here at the ranch certainly do. Without going into further detail, I'm fairly confident that we'll be able to milk our cows in relative security. If not, well it's back to plan B (see above).

    Now to another one of your points, where did you get the notion that Christian scruples negate vigorous self-defense? For an excellent example of this consider reading "Patriots" by James Wesley, Rawles. (I realize it's just a book, but if you can throw Wyndham at me, I can surely hit you with a dose of Rawles.)

    Finally, the world has seen bad times before. But as we've seen time and time again, good overcomes evil in the end. The light drives out the darkness. I also believe that even with the occasional reversal, human history shows a clear trend towards greater individual freedom, liberty, and human maturity. Call me delusional if you like. But since your view seems to be that my delusion and your nihilism lead to the same end, I chose mine: Helps me sleep better at night.

    Cheers,
    Husband of the boss.

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  5. Good reply Husband of the Boss!

    These disinfo agents are stepping up their tactics. In the last couple of weeks I have begun to feel annoyed at the comments being left by people who obviously are not on particular sites for information or knowledge. It just makes it ever so apparent who they are and what their agenda is.

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  6. Heh. Silly people think that the rural people haven't already made alliances among their neighbors for mutual protection. We already watch over each other's places.

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  7. Great post, Patrice! And thanks Husband of the Boss for bringing the conversation back to logic and away from terrifying tirades.

    We're just beginning our preparedness lifestyle, but luckily I've kindof always been geared towards prepping (comes from childcare-you never know what you'll need with short notice), and we have a modest but growing supply of extras. I've designated a very large dresser full of supplies, emergency food, first-aid, etc. We have a long way to go, but at least we're both on the same page in our house.

    Your piece was great food for thought. Thanks.

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  8. Thanks for the link to SurvivalMom, Patrice, it's just what I've been needing! A canning question for you--is it possible to can butter? My initial goal is to stock up for "A Week Without"(power and water) and although I'm planning to stock shortening and veg oil, there are some things that we use butter for, that would be difficult to substitute--pancakes? toast? Ideas?

    Birdy

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  9. I have not canned butter, but my friend Enola Gay (http://paratusfamilia.blogspot.com/) has. She has a post on some of the difficulties with canning butter (http://paratusfamilia.blogspot.com/2010/08/eating-humble-pie-canning-butter.html). I'm pretty sure she had another post on how she canned it, but I wasn't able to find it. However if you were to drop her a line, I'm sure she can fill you in on her techniques.

    - Patrice

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  10. I love this story. I live in a nice sized city, and on a hill. According to a retired sheriff who is a family friend my house is great because of the fence and such that will keep people out. However, I have been talking to my friend and his wife (both retired sheriffs in their 40's) about getting a food storage going etc.....You know being a good friend, and their response to what I say is " We'll come live with you, you provide the food we'll provide the guns and amo"! First off, I am sorry but 3 more people including a possible 2 in-laws (60/70yrs and my family mom 55/75 grandmother = 7 with out their family for a grand total 10 in my 1200 sq foot house not good especially when their youngest child is a hell raiser (9yrs old girl) and second their youngest eats more than my husband and I combined, this child can eat 2 hamburgers (the huge ones, gourmet) with fries, sodas and still want dessert. My first thought is NO NO, I am willing to guide you all on how to get prepared, but I can not afford feeding your family.

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  11. Fantastic piece Patrice. I'm sure it's going to get WIDE distribution. I'm already making a list...

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  12. Great article. I've had a few people say, "We'll just come to your house." They are usually joking, but perhaps only because bleep hasn't actually happened. I used to smile when I said, "Yeah, right," but any more I turn a jaundiced eye on them and say, "Try that...see how it works out for you." They know my stuff includes the means to keep what's mine. I sincerely hope that isn't their plan for real or they are in for a very rude surprise. That's also why I try and try and TRY to get folks I care about - and that are in close proximity - to prepare for themselves. The more they do, the less pressure there is to come looking to mooch. It also allows me to apply the "I told you so" salve to my conscience when I tell them to tell their story walkin'.

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  13. I just try to get close family to think on this "If for whatever reason you and those who depend on you could not leave your house for 7 days, what would you eat and drink on the 7th day." then I urge them to acquire a weeks supply of dried, canned and bottled food and water. At least that will provide a little time to think before panic sets in.

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