Country Living Series

Monday, February 14, 2011

A taste of things to come

Cha-ching!

Clothing prices are set to rise 10% in the spring, mostly due to increased cost of cotton.

The cost of produce is skyrocketing because of the freezing weather they've experienced in the southern U.S. and northern Mexico.

Hang on, bumpy ride ahead....

9 comments:

  1. Prices have already gone up here on dairy products and many other things, quite significantly, in just two weeks time. It's so frustrating. Hadn't heard about the cotton prices...my goodness!

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  2. It is so difficult to make a budget when the prices of everything are so volatile.
    All I can say is grow as much of your own as you can and buy locally grown, in season produce and even meats.
    Paintedmoose

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  3. Bumpy ride ahead is right. Not only are commodities going sky-high, but now there is talk of selling the NYSE to a German company.
    Why don't we just put a "For Sale" sign on the entire country and take a vacation with the money? This is getting beyond dopey, this is getting suicidal. Our politicians and international business bosses and unions are destroying our country and we're not protesting in the streets. What's wrong with US?

    I'm going to grab a bucket of tar, anybody got a pillowcase full of feathers?

    Anonymous Patriot
    USA

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  4. My dad just told me about this last night. He works in the cotton industry and is the largest producer in the United States. Good news for him but bad news for the rest of us...

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  5. I just paid $2.79/lb. for red delicious apples that would've been .79/lb a year ago. UGH. I've noticed that butter's up, too, about 60% is my guess. Not looking foward to this...

    Birdy in Central Ca

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  6. Same for the corn and soybean growers around here. They have waited a long time for this bounty. It seems every dog will have it's day. Problem is that one thing leads to another. I am thrilled to see the car dealers unloading their pickups and such. The TOTAL business environment is all wrong for a sustained recovery. I am one dog who will keep plugging away because if I am to have a day (of rest) then I will have to make it happen.

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  7. I love the suggestion to buy local, assuming that your area has everything you're looking for available.....

    As much as this can trash a budget, it is important to buy American as often as you can.....food prices will go up and down, what scares me more is when it disappears and just can't be found anywhere anymore.....

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  8. Just keep watching the European nations. They are the canary in the coal mine and when they start dropping like Dominoes, the ecoflu will hit here next. Buy your tighty whities and any cotton goods now. In a month or so prices will double. BUY any and all good you use, from food to toilet paper. We are now in the toilet flushing stage, on the way to the septic tank. Anonymous Patriot, I got the feathers, I am game!

    Had Enuff

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  9. In addition to all of the good reasons we've always had for stocking up, we can add inflation to the list. Despite the government and the media (sorry, is that redundant?) trying to keep a lid on the news, inflation - especially with food - has been ramping up for a good year now. And everything points to it getting much, MUCH worse.

    I recently sent a very simple e-mail to a certain circle of friends. To wit: "Buy food. Buy lots of food. But all of the food you can afford and then some. Buy all of the food you can stuff under your roof. That's all, have a nice day!"

    They're used to getting such pronouncements from me, but the bottom line is this: everything you buy today will cost you more tomorrow, next week, next month and next year. perhaps so much more you cannot fathom that you will not even be able to afford basics. Everything extra you buy today that you would have to buy at some point anyway, is the only 100% protection against inflation that there is.

    Jeff

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