Country Living Series

Monday, September 12, 2011

Fried apple pies

Last July, our neighbor Enola Gay made some fried apple pies to bring to a neighborhood Independence Day celebration. They were outstanding! I was pleased when she blogged the recipe shortly thereafter because I've been wanting to try them myself.

I had my chance this weekend for our neighborhood potluck when I decided to make fried apple pies for dessert. I won't reprint the recipe since you can find it on Enola's site.

I started by melting margarine in boiling water...

...then added sugar and salt.

Adding the flour. This made the dough very stick and got harder to mix as I added the full amount of flour.

In fact, it got so hard to mix in the pot on the stove that I ended up dumping everything out on the breadboard and kneading it together, which worked out fine (except the dough was HOT!).

I put the dough in the refrigerator to chill for half an hour, then pinched off a big chunk and rolled it out thin.

I used a pot lid to make circles, about six inches in diameter...

...and stacked them on a plate. I got about eighteen pie shells from the batch.

I used apple pie filling to fill the pies. (In case you're wondering about the difference in color between the two jars: these are from separate batches of pie filling, and in the batch on the left I used lemon juice to keep the apples from discoloring. That's the only difference.)

Each pie doesn't take much filling. I folded the dough over and pinched the edges with a fork.

Out of the 18 pie shells I cut out, one quart of apple pie filling filled 17 of them, so I had one shell left over (which I fried anyway and the kids ate). It certainly wasn't worth opening a second quart of pie filling just for that last pie.

I could fit four pies to a pan. Frying on the first side...

...then the other.

While the pies were frying, I made the icing.

The results were out-of-this-world delicious.

This first batch was experimental, to see (a) if they worked, and (b) how many I could get out of a batch. So the next day I doubled the recipe and made a larger batch for the potluck. Ended up with 36 pies and used two quarts of pie filling.

More frying.

Took awhile to fry all 36, but finally got them done.

The pies were such a hit at the potluck that I knew I had a winner recipe to add to my repertoire. By the end of the evening, all 36 pies were nearly gone. Thanks, Enola!


  1. oh.. my.. goodness!! Those look so good I want to lick the screen.

  2. We will be SO trying this when it gets cooler around here. Thanks for the recipe and the link.
    Now I am hungry...:)

  3. Those pies look SO good! I also was wondering how I would go about ordering a wooden tankard from you and your husband. I sent an email to your tankard email address but I am not sure how often you check it so I thought I would try here! Thanks! Katie

  4. I really enjoy your blog. The fried apple pies look good, I've always liked those but I have to say I do like fried chocolate pies even more.

  5. I was just wondering: What kind of oil do you use for frying and how do you know it's hot enough before you start? Yummy!!! Thanks!
    --K in OK <><

  6. Holy cow, those look good! Guess I know what I'll be making soon... how do you make your apple pie filling?

  7. Her pies are so good, I tried them the next day after she posted it!!!! YUMMY....

  8. Seeing the un-fried pies lined up on the cookie sheet reminded me immediately of the way my mom lined them up the same way, ready to fry. She sometimes had fried apple pies waiting for us after school, what a treat! Then we'd have one at lunch the next day. She made the filling with dried apples from my grandparents' farm and didn't use a glaze, she'd just sprinkle a little sugar on them. Fried Peach pies are really good too.

  9. Chicken legs are pretty easy to set (as are duck legs). One rooster that I didn't notice was injured had his lower leg and foot fall off and walked on the, er, drumstick. He got around so good that way that I could never catch him! Time and old age finally caught him, though.

  10. Umm, looks really good! Thanks for the post and recipe!

  11. kingdom for Smell-O-Vision.