Country Living Series

Monday, July 7, 2014

Heat wave

It's hot. We've bounced from chilly enough to think about starting a fire in the woodstove, to hot enough to cook an egg on the dashboard, in the space of two weeks... so we're all trying to adjust to the temperatures.

High summer means daisies. I know they're weeds, but sheesh they're beautiful. I've always loved daisies.


This is also when the oceanspray blooms.



It's good haying weather -- hot and dry, with no rain in sight -- and many fields are getting mowed and baled.



Right now Wednesday's temperature promises to hover around 100F. We have friends in California and Oregon who are reporting 110F temps. Gack.


Today was a decidedly toasty 91F. Gack.


We decided to move the critters from the pasture to the wooded side of the property. It's not humane to let animals bake in unrelenting heat with no shade or shelter, if we can offer them an alternative.

So around noon, I saw the herd in the farthest corner of the property.


I hollered our universal cattle call, named after the first cow we ever had: "Bossy bossy bossy bossy BOSSY!!" Heads jerked up, bellows and whinnies sounded, and within seconds the herd was on the run.


Brit our horse was in the lead, of course. Brit is always in the lead.


Stampede!


Within about a minute or two, everyone came barreling around the corner of the barn, heading for the gate into the woods.


Delighted by the change in scenery, they fanned out and explored what there was to eat.



This was little Chuck's first chance to meet everyone in person rather than through a fence. He was a little nervous!




The animals settled right in, finding the good grazing.


We noticed Sparky had a thick strand of mucous hanging from her backside, suggesting imminent birth. Good thing she's on this side of the property now, where she has shelter from the sun.


Later Don managed to get both Sparky and her yearling calf Dusty into the corral, where they immediately took advantage of the barn's shade.


I'm gonna hazard a guess and say she'll have her calf within about 48 hours.


The barn was messy, so I cleaned it up...


...and spread some clean straw. Dusty inspects the results.


Now we're ready for both the heat and a new calf.

10 comments:

  1. Your title reminds me of the scene in "A Muppets Christmas Carol" where Scrooge tells the mice they can't have any more coal and they start singing "Heat wave! This is my island in the sun. Oi! Oi!"

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  2. I don't care that they're officially weeds, daisies have always been my favorite flower. They are so beautiful. Hope everything goes great for Sparky and she has a healthy little calf. Your weather is about par for course for us, and ours covers a 3-4 month period! Yep it's hot!

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  3. Hey, a weed is just a plant growing where you don't want it to. If you're happy with the daisies where they are, then they are officially "wildflowers" to enjoy, not "weeds".

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  4. Your good stewardship never fails to impress me, Patrice. Congrats in advance on the new calf, and thanks as always for the gorgeous pictures of that gorgeous pony of yours. Golly what a babe. And she picks up those feet when she goes.

    Count me in when it comes to daisies. They're beautiful. They shout "happy" and the basil leaves are delicious in salads!

    We're not quite as hot up here, but dang near it. We've got the big sprinkler going on the enclosed pasture to keep it from going crispy critters, and there'll be much hand watering of all the potted plants on the place this morning.

    We're on high alert here after a coyote came up to the house and tried to take a bite out of our ram. He drew blood and left two puncture wounds, which have responded well to treatment. Stinkin' coyotes. I have a little welcome party set up in case it/they return.

    Time to replace our beloved old dog. After some research and discussion we've decided we need a Lydia. Having only ever had rescue animals we'll begin by looking for a Pyrenees rescue group, but we also have a good contact to a proven breeder in a not-too-distant part of the state.

    OK....time for me to get off here and go milk.

    Stay cool, everyone!

    A. McSp

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  5. Those daisies are also edible.check out Linda Runyuns books and DVD for info.

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  6. Cleaning out a barn in 91-degree heat.....DOUBLE Gack!

    Sidebar: I like to think of a weed simply as a plant one doesn't want to be where it happens to be. Those beautiful daisies are just like Indian Paintbrush out west, Texas Bluebonnets down south and Cornblooms in the Midwest: A fleeting thing of beauty to enjoy while you can. What a sight!

    Just Me

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  7. I'ts cooled off back east where I am, and the rain has been so common farmers are having trouble getting a long enough dry spell to get hay in - there is already talk hay prices will go up again.

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  8. I would melt, lol. Stay cool, and post pix of the baby!

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    Replies
    1. Nah, you'd get used to it. We live in Florida without A/C, just a whole house fan.

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  9. I remember reading once that wildflowers are weeds with a press agent! LOL

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