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Friday, October 4, 2019

A word about watermelons

We've spent years researching what short-season heirloom varieties of fruits and vegetables grow best in our northern climate. One challenging fruit was watermelon. Most people swear by Blacktail Mountain watermelons, but somehow we stumbled across something called Cream of Saskatchewan and never looked back.

This variety is thought to have been brought to Canada by Russian immigrants around the turn of the century. It bears fruit within 80 days, so it grows fine here. It's prolific, and the melons seem to max out around six or seven pounds.

We've gotten hooked on these wonderful melons. This photo was taken on August 6:


By the end of September, we had large beautiful melons.


The flesh is a creamy white-yellow and very sweet.


Naturally we save the seeds for next year.


I cut up a couple of the melons to bring to this week's potluck, and urged everyone to save the seeds for their gardens.


If anyone's looking for an unusual short-season heirloom variety, I can highly recommend this beauty.

5 comments:

  1. With the Grand Solar Minimum already upon us, it is important to be gathering short-season and cold-tolerant crop seeds for the future growing seasons. Thank you for this recommendation.

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  2. I do not think I have ever seen a white fleshed watermelon. Thank you for sharing!

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  3. I didn't have a lot of luck with either Blacktail or Cream of Saskatchewan. My growing season is funky. Short, almost as short as yours, but we tend to be hot for what we have. Sugar Baby generally does well for me, though it doesn't produce as large a watermelon. This year I tried a variety named Kaho Watermelon. We had a funky funky and not very nice growing season, but I just pulled a tiny little melon off of the plant. Its not fully ripe, and since we got a frost last night I have no idea if it'll taste decent at all, but it was pretty much the only melon I grew this year to produce a melon at all. I'm kinda impressed and will have to try them again next year.

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  4. I would like to try that next year as I haven't had much luck with watermellons here in the UP. Where did you get the seed ?

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    Replies
    1. Click on the link highlighted in the post.

      - Patrice

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