Country Living Series

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Re-introducing Friday Roundups

A dear friend recently told me preparedness is declining in the wake of Trump's election. We both agreed The Donald taking office may stave off an economic decline for awhile, but not forever. It does, however, buy us more time. America is still staggering under a massive and unpayable debt level, and for this reason alone I urge people not to let their guard down.

Almost two years ago, I instigated a weekly blog event called a "Friday Roundup." The idea was to post whatever we did during the week, big or small, that inched us toward increased self-sufficiency or self-reliance. It lasted about two months, then faded away (turns out Fridays are actually pretty durned busy for us).

But I thought the idea was kinda cool: namely, since everyone's circumstances and situations are different and we can all learn from each other, I invited everyone to pitch in and explain to other readers what steps they took during the week -- remember, big or small -- toward preparedness.

So I'd like to re-introduce the Friday Roundups. Ahem -- you'll notice this blog post is appearing on a Thursday, but "Thursday Roundup" doesn't have quite the same ring. I can't guarantee a Friday Roundup will appear every week on the same day like clockwork -- it may drift around a bit -- but the date isn't as important as the content.

So let's get started. Since it's winter and we're waist-deep in snow, outdoor work is limited; but we've done a few things this week:

• I ordered two sweet cherry bushes from Burgess. Last summer we got our first small crop from our two tart cherry bushes; and while they puréed beautifully, we also wanted sweet cherries for fresh eating. (We also wanted bushes instead of trees.) After some research, we found these sweet cherry bushes which hopefully will fill the niche. When ordering, I confirmed with the company they wouldn't be shipped until later in the spring, since I can't even get through the garden gate due to snow. We do, however, have a place to plant the tiny bushes when they arrive.


• I'm purging. Forget spring cleaning -- spring is usually too busy -- but snowy weather is an incomparable time to dig down in the corners and eradicate the unnecessary. Don and I started with our bedroom, which – being upstairs away from the vacuum cleaner – tends to accumulate dust. (Dust is something of a mainstay around here, between the farm and the woodshop.) Don’s allergies finally demanded we do something about it, so we gave our room a thorough cleaning and purged clothes and shoes we no longer needed. We ransacked the dark recesses of closets and found two old dog toys Lydia had stashed there ages ago. The bedroom is now bright and airy and dust-free (for the time being).

Buoyed by this success, I started tackling other neglected corners. We are a book-heavy household, and over the years began accumulating books we read once and no longer wanted to keep. Same with magazines. The books, being heavy things, probably jettisoned hundreds of pounds of weight all by themselves. This is an ongoing process I'll continue through the winter.


• We've been strengthening our neighborhood ties. Preparedness is a three-legged stool, and "community" is one of those legs. Don and some other neighbors got together (as they do about once a month) to discuss increased neighborhood cohesion and assistance.

This time of year, part of this cohesion and assistance involves snow removal. Here a neighbor is using a tractor-mounted snowblower to clear our driveway:


Here we're getting another neighbor's truck unstuck in the week after Christmas.


• We held our weekly potluck -- which also contributes to neighborhood cohesion and assistance.


So, with the understanding we're in the middle of winter and projects are limited ... what's your Friday Roundup?

51 comments:

  1. Hi Patrice! Couldn't help but drool at your pile 'O books! My husband and I have a small business selling books and other goods as third party merchants on Amazon. Wouldn't be surprised if you could make a couple hundred dollars off that pile! :)

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  2. I really appreciated this post. It's great to get to see/hear what others do to prepare.

    Thank you!

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  3. I recently moved from an acre in a small town, to a half acre in a tiny village. (Small town got much bigger in the 10 yrs I lived there. Too many people and traffic) I started going to church here, and have met people that know everyone else so there are no strangers in our one traffic light farming community! I also started going to a sewing group (explaining that I don't know enough about how to use a machine) and was welcomed with many volunteers to teach me all I need to know. My new old house needs (thermal) curtains, you see. Was very glad I planned ahead in summer when I moved in, by purchasing a large load of firewood, as we had below freezing temps here for nearly a week. Purchased some organizers for my new pantry, thru amazon who delivers, saving me gas to go anywhere looking for them. Watched a video about aging on a homestead; Deep South Homestead talks about what he would have done differently as a young person, in planning ahead for declining years on his homestead.
    Glad to see Friday Roundup back, any day of the week!

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  4. I am digging through the freezer and using up or canning whatever I can. It is saving on the food bill and getting some of the canning done in cool instead of hot weather. This is part of my yearly routine so I freeze things that don't loose texture after freezing till can now. I also dehydrate fruit and vegetables at this time of year because the dehydrator really gives off heat and humidity, which is welcome at this time of year. Happy preserving to all! DJ

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  5. Thanks for restarting this series. Since January and February are my most expensive months for utilities, I have been working hard at using up items in my freezer and pantry.

    I did venture out to the thrift store as my only 'retail' shopping this week and scored some pint canning jars and rings.
    SJ in Vancouver BC Canada

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  6. I agree with you; the election bought us some time, but that's about it. The core problems plaguing our country are still out there. The days we see coming are nothing I would hope for. The LAST thing I want in this case is to be proven right. Face it though; thinking Trump will cure the ills of this country is akin to turning up the radio to hide that knocking sound coming from the engine!

    Keep prepping folks! And don't forget those "staying prepared" tasks like running the generators, cycling the food stores, fitness, and wearing out your Bibles!

    ...I'm sure it was quite a while between when God told Noah to build the ark, and when it actually started raining...

    God bless!

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  7. Because we moved to N Idaho a year and a half ago I am at the tail end of unpacking. I do eBay and simply put, a lot of stuff ended up in the room for business. You know, one of those rooms where everything ends up to clear another room. So for me it is the clearing of stuff. If I can't sell it in a shop space and it is no longer desirable on eBay, then it is off to the local thrift shop. This week I am at the tail end of the "stuff" Still a few trunks of toys to finish up, thanks to no more grandchildren, something's gotta give. I have been doing the food storage in the basement, getting a clear handle on that too. Hopefully next Friday I can report on that never ending prepping project also. Thanks for getting me moving on these projects. You are right, because of Trump we have gotten a little reprieve should the unthinkable happen, we have to stay vigilant and not forget to prep.

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  8. The county recently chopped and chipped a bunch of volunteer pest trees growing along the road near us. We got the landowners' permission to run off with the wood chips (something the county didn't elect to do when it made the chips in the first place) so we've got all the wood chip mulch we can carry. It keeps the kids busy and the truck muddy.

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  9. Just wondering how Donald (PE, not brother) will stave off economic problems? I'm not reading the same stuff you are. Can you suggest some articles? Thanks...

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  10. We had 60 degree weather here in North Carolina this week so I did some fruit tree, grape and berry bush pruning while everything is dormant.

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  11. My move from a small town to my tiny cabin comes in (Lord willing) May so I'm preparing to live with one or maybe two 15-amp electric plugs (my total electrical system!) and 192 square feet plus two small lofts compared to 1,100 square feet now. Some things will be stored since the cabin isn't the final stop (again, Lord willing) but more is being sorted and disposed of. As others have said, I'm going through the freezer and canning or dehydrating whatever I can. I scored three large turkeys (43 pounds worth) for 79 cents a pound with another $5 promotion off per turkey ... so 43 pounds for $19.64. That will fill a lot of canning jars with both meat and stock.

    I wholeheartedly agree that this is not the end of the issues; in fact, with the current divisions raging all around, the new administration might be a catalyst for more. I'm in the red part of a blue state and even out here the rhetoric is flying. It's literally brother fighting brother. I'm feeling pushed hard by the Holy Spirit to get to the cabin and to prepare for a difficult season in whatever form that takes.

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  12. I am just back at school and taking one day at a time. That means hoping I can get to work and home each day. With an average ANNUAL snowfall of 24" we are at 60" with a LOT of winter left. Today our wind chill was -28 F when I looked. Since the road is the low spot between 5 and 6 foot piles "ground blizzard" is not on the ground, but rather the "windshield high blizzard". Still, the hens are mostly 20F and higher and producing well under light.(2nd winter with them). I keep learning more about them and with the tremendous snow cover we have i am hopeful my new strawberries and raspberries will survive the predicted -20s air temps predicted tonight. And I was worried that I did not get them covered last fall because some winters we get no snow and these temps would do them in. The ponies are fed and the tractor is plugged in to its timer. Natokadn

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  13. I could add that I saw a Bald eagle again today (2nd one in two weeks)and a Great Horned owl. No snowy owls this year (yet) and the Gold Finches left this week. I wonder if the Red Polls will show up now.. Natokadn

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  14. I practiced starting the generator in case DH isn't around to do it...we only have 2 hours from the time the power goes out til the basement starts to flood...and hooking up important stuff to it. Also on my list this month is to clean out the office, the spare room, and the freezers. Not going shopping for groceries this month, using up older stuff, and making a list as to what we have as well as what we need.

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  15. My favorite treat is a small bowl of home grown frozen tart cherries wit a little sugar on them. Try planting some North Star cherry trees. I got real lucky with having a Mulberry tree next to my orchard and all the birds and critters hit that instead of the cherries.

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  16. Organizing and more organizing. Cleaning out closets and drawers and giving what we don't need to Goodwill, putting spare blankets in vehicles along with water and some snacks in case of The Big One (we're in CA), and also cleaning out the pantry and replacing long-expired goods with fresh ones. Oh, and hitting the thrift stores in search of off-season clothes...this is the best time to buy things for summer.

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  17. Long term commitment to a major life change can drain even the most ardent supporter, so thank you for the encouragement to keep on keeping on.

    This week I did an in-depth inventory and developed a spreadsheet of my supplies: food, water, hygiene, medical and how-to library. Another positive was sharing "The Survival Mom" book with a young mom who is feeling very unsettled but doesn't know how to proceed. I know you appreciate Lisa's (the Survival Mom) calm approach to prepping. We want to motivate and encourage, not stampede folks in a wild panic. You and Lisa are so very good at doing that and I greatly appreciate your down-to-earth support and encouragement.

    Next week a young mom is coming over and we're going to can some pork I got on sale. That's how we do it...one mom at a time.

    You are doing great. Patrice. Keep on keeping on!!

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  18. Patrice, Here is something someone posted on my FB and I thought of you. This is the only way I had to send it. I really hope you don't mind. I don't intend it to be posted on Comments, unless you want to. Love your Blog!Especially today's. I need to do the same cleaning and organizing. See below:
    Scott Herndon
    of Abolish Human Abortion North Idaho

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  19. Have several Faraday cages for "stuff" that could be damaged but spotted some EMP bags on Amazon & figured "Why not?" Could be double protection or could be a total waste.

    Glad to see others acknowledge that Trump is not the cure for what ails us. "They" will pull the rug out from under him financially & otherwise. It won't be fun but it'll be interesting.

    Keep on preppin'; don't get on the bus; & God Bless America!

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    1. Fire safes also offer SOME protection from EMP, as well as the fire and water they're billed to protect against. A good test for EMP protection is to put a cell phone in the container you're considering, close the door, and call the phone. If it doesn't ring, it's got at least some protection against RF, as the phone's not getting a connection. Along with the usual records one usually keeps in the safe, I keep a VHF/UHF ham radio walkie-talkie (HT), a compact ICOM HF/VHF/UHF tranceiver, and thumb drives with important stuff on them. Will they survive an EMP? I don't know. But it's better to do that than to just leave everything in a box or drawer.

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  20. Trump bought us more time, but like you, I think we have "interesting times" ahead. I stocked my freezers in November/December, so any shopping now is fresh veggies & milk. I am going back to dried milk. It is cheaper, it is always in the house, & I can't shop if I am not in the store! The struggle for me is to get ahead of the curve on dog kibble. I have freeze dried meat & rice, but I'd like to get 100 pounds of kibble ahead-just in case. I am also working on paying off bills. 2 credit cards to go. Probably the most important "prepping" thing is scheduling my knees for surgery. I have put it off and put it off. When the truck killed all of those people in Germany, I thought-wow! If I had to run for my life, I couldn't. Time to just buck up and do this surgery. I wonder if any other preppers have thought of things like this? To survive, your body needs to be in the best possible shape. And that is preparing too.
    -Stealth Spaniel

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    1. Don't get too far ahead on the kibble, unless you can use it all before its expiration date. Kibble has fat/oil in it, and it goes rancid. I found that out when I went through my disaster larder. The same thing happens to things like peanut butter, granola bars, energy bars, and the like. Better to keep this stuff rotating through your normal pantry. ...Of course... the dogs will probably eat the rancid kibbles anyway... along with the rancid peanut butter, granola bars, and energy bars...

      Yeah; do whatever you can to stay fit. Your body, mind, and soul are your most important preps!

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  21. Montana Gal has been busy keeping the Homestead heated and all while I was under the weather.

    I did write an editorial which is somewhat related to what Patrice alluded to. It follows:

    The next time you hear that Trump will turn the country around, think about the word 'trillion'.

    1 Trillion seconds equals 32,000 years.

    The US debt is $20 trillion.

    Now the bad news: Your 401k, retirement plan, savings account and all US dollar-based assets (excluding cash) are merely numbers on a screen. They can be changed with strokes of a keyboard, but not your keyboard.

    What is my point? If you can't touch it, you don't own it. Everything is not going to be OK.

    Montana Guy




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  22. I'm on Montana Guy's side. The viciousness and deceit of the left is certainly showing exactly who the basket of deplorables are. The measured coordination of their behaviour is a chilling portent. George Orwell pointed out that the most committed fascists are lefties who feel threatened. The virulence isn't going to end -- and when the violence finally becomes overt, the US is going to show the world exactly what a model 'democracy' it is. I'm scared.

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  23. I have finally decided to begin I know it sounds late, but have finished reading a book recommended by another site, One day after. Shook me up pretty good.
    doing some shopping this weekend.

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    1. Do what I did; ask yourself "What if the power goes out?" Start small and work up, or you'll be overwhelmed!

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    2. One Second After by same author will scare you even more! Lots to learn; so little time.
      Mary Ellen

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  24. After the passing of my mother last spring, we have begun to seriously talk about leaving our gated condo neighborhood and finding a place northeast of town with a little acreage. Little by little, we have been purging and organizing all winter, and I was able to combine Christmas campus shutdown with some vacation time to organize things further. It was wonderful to be able to get rid of all that stuff! My husband and I never really sorted through our things when he moved in, so it’s nice to have that out of my head and out of my way. Additionally, we came to the realization that if one of us was working at home, we would ultimately be healthier all around. We are hoping to make that a reality someday as well. Until then, I will continue to organize and purge on weekends and days off, even if it’s just one garbage bag that gets thrown out or one cabinet that gets cleaned—those little steps will pay off by summer, when we hope to find a new place. Maria

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  25. I am old enough that I have to take moneys from my IRA. I purchased some 22LR from SG ammo (it looks like the drought is over) and am planning for a trip to the JCLDS pantry to purchase some rice, beans and pasta. That leaves me some money left but I do not know what else to purchase. I did try to prepay my property taxes but found I can not do that.

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    1. It is not how much you have but how well you know how to use what you do have. In the food department, I hope it is not just those 3 items, imagine if that was all you would eat. Get some flavor in there. If you need any meds or supplements on a regular basis, stock up. Imagine a power outage that simply did not return to normal, what would you like to have around. How about simply bandages? I am one of those that is in constant need of band-aids. Therefore I have a very large collection of them. Get your items on sales and discounts, make every penny count. Don't forget water, containers for water and sterilization of said water, "junk" silver and a few barter items. You don't have to do it all in one day, it is a process of every day living. Good luck, and happy prepping.

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    2. bandaids, the latex kind do expire and lose adhesion. Get latex free medical tape and gauze bandages and nostick telfa pads instead. don't get and save latex gloves etc.

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    3. What do you buy next? I don't know, but here's the advice I give people. When you need to replace something nonperishable, get two. This gives you one to use and another to put in long-term storage. I would also suggest that you watch for sales. I have been buying extra canned fruits and vegetables, pasta, paper goods, and cleaning supplies as they have been on sale. I agree with the anonymous comment. You do need flavor to keep some variety in your diet. I have a very large stockpile of spices. They've also been on sale lately.
      I know it's overwhelming when you are trying to figure out what to do next. Just take it a little at a time. There are some good plans out there to help. Check out http://thesurvivalmom.com/free-2017-prepper-planner/ for some ideas. Not everything in the plan may work for you, but it gives you something to think about. Adjust it to suit your needs. Good luck. You can do it, even on a budget.

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    4. Thanks for your replies. Problem is that I have a bunch of medical stuff, including an extra year or 13 mo. of my prescriptions ( nice to have a Dr. that understands) I already have a bunch of rice, beans, oats, wheat, and canned meat. I am really pretty well fixed but I do not know what to buy with my enforced windfall. I will keep the purchasing 2 when I need one thing in mind I guess that is about the best I can do for now.

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  26. We are currently getting freezing rain, and I’m warm and toasty at home. I did make a quick stop at the grocery store yesterday to pick up some strawberries and romaine lettuce. It was a little crowded, but not crazy like it usually is before a winter storm. People here seem to be more prepared than they were a few years ago.

    This week:
    -I have all of the animals ready for the icy weather. They’re all set with plenty of feed, straw, and water.
    -I stocked up on prescription migraine, nausea, and non-narcotic pain meds (I only get about three migraines a year now and they're not too bad, but I continue to keep the meds. I use natural remedies when I get a headache.); razor blades; paper plates; spices; toothpaste; 2 large packages of AA batteries; soap; trash bags; vitamin supplements; and popcorn.
    -The new indoor herb garden has started growing, and I’m planning to start a few more seeds today.
    -The replacement HAM radios were delivered. The battery wouldn’t charge on one of the others. I hope these work.
    -I repaired and altered a few clothing items for kids and grandkids.
    -I sold enough eggs this week to buy chicken feed for the month.
    -My (goat) kids are due in April. This is a first for me. I got a bag of kid colostrum supplement, bottle, and extra nipples. I already have some goat’s milk frozen, just in case.
    -I’m continuing to save my entire paycheck and part of my husband’s. We should all live below our means. This will enable us to be providers.


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    1. Hey, "Grammy;" can you give this relative newby any advice on hens that stop laying? I live in the Southwest, so the temps aren't getting that cold. I have seven hens; a mix of Rhode Island Reds and Buff Orpingtons, and an Orp rooster. None of the hens are over 1.5 years old. They have a choice of two feeds; Purina Layenna Crumbles, and a high protein mash from a local mill. They're eating well and look good. They also have a protein block to peck at, along with whatever scraps I throw into the run. Watering is automated. The coop itself used to be a 10x10 foot shed, and is REALLY well insulated.

      I was getting over three dozen eggs from them up until last May. Output has been dropping ever since. I've gotten FOUR EGGS in the last TWELVE DAYS. Any advice would be a blessing.

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    2. I'm not an expert, but I can tell you what I was doing when mine slowed down on laying. I was giving them too many "treats." When I slacked off on the scraps, they started laying better about two or three weeks later. I still give treats, but in very limited amounts. I also found that changing the feed will sometimes help. Mine do better on layer pellets instead of crumbles. I don't know if this is just a fluke, or if there is a difference.
      Make sure they have plenty of room outside of the coop. Mine were a little overcrowded until I built an additional coop and run. This improved the number of eggs I got.
      My chickens tend to slow down in the winter when we have fewer hours of daylight. I add artificial light to help. Right now I only have 17 hens. I'm getting 8-13 eggs a day. Most days I get 10 or 11. This keeps my family in eggs, with occasional extras to sell.
      Another possibility is to blame the rooster. Is he bothering the hens too much? Are other animals or people harassing them? If they're being scared or stalked, they may lay fewer eggs or stop completely. This can last for a few weeks. So if they're being constantly bothered, they may have stopped laying. If hens aren't happy, they won't lay.
      I have found that my hens really slack off laying when they reach about 2 years old. I have a rotation every year of chickens. I replace half every year, getting rid of the two-year-olds. This keeps me in eggs while the chicks are maturing enough to lay.
      I hope this helps. Good luck, Pete.

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  27. Part 1:
    Sure wish my projects were limited by winter!Been working on the new "permanent" food garden - 266'x 40'. This is where all the berries, grapes, hops, asparagus, rhubarb and small fruits will be moved to. Hubby got 100' in the center all worked up last fall for the berries. That gives me room for five 100' rows. I have been measuring, marking out the rows, allocating space (how much room for each crop) and hauling bedding/manure from last seasons goat houses in my toboggan and placing it on the rows. It has already had 9 months to start composting under cover in the barns and will have 4 more months to compost in place before I can start planting. When I run out of that material, will start on the big chicken coop and get that cleaned out and add the material to the rows. And when I run out of that material, will start hauling hardwood wood chips from the local sawmill to add and have on hand to mulch as I plant. Then it will be time to prune the 35+ fruit trees, and the ramial tips will be chipped in our chipper to add to the mix, with the larger pieces going to the goats - there is nothing they like better. See Michael Phillips book "The Holistic Orchard" to learn about the benefits of using ramial chips. Then when it warms up and thaws, will start gathering the leaves on the roads and paths in the forest, run those through the chipper shredder and add some to the rows, some to the garden beds and set up some piles to turn into leafmould. 5 years ago bought one each of a yellow fall raspberry, a red fall raspberry, a red summer raspberry, a black raspberry and a thornless blackberry. Have been letting them grow and spread - to the point I already have enough plants to fill the five 100' rows allotted...and give away 30 to 50 extra plants I won't have room for. The 66'x40' south of the berries will go into asparagus, rhubarb and strawberries. The 100'x 40' space north of the berries will go into grapes, hops, dwarf tart cherries, blueberries, honeyberries, goji berries and sea buckthorn.
    Working on building a closer relationship with the lady that runs our Soil Conservation District's annual tree/plant/bulb sales. Called to see what varieties of fruit trees will be offered this year...8 apples, 2 pears, 2 peaches, 2 plums. Asked her if next year she could include some specific varieties I would like (red-fleshed apples and earlier varieties)- and found she is willing and can get some of those varieties for me this year!!! And even better, at the same modest price ($15 each or 5/$70). The trees they get are the same size and quality as what would cost you $30-$50 retail. And made a date for next fall to go visit an orchard about an hour away that has over 1,400 varieties of apples! Uh-oh...after getting 8 more trees this year, that only leaves me room for 5 more next year in the new orchard. So have been scouting the property to try to figure out where I might be able to wedge in a "newer orchard" (hehe).
    PlantLady

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  28. Part 2:
    Still chin-deep in seed/tree/plant catalogs and garden maps, trying to figure out how much of what to grow where and when. I have a 6,000 sq. ft. garden (so far) and have been selling at the farmers market for 3 years now. Didn't plan to be a market gardener, just wanted to ready enough ground and practice growing enough food for truly hard times. But working out real well, covering the costs of expanding the gardens and orchards all the time, paying for food preservation equipment and supplies and other necessities. If I hadn't ploughed the proceeds into expansion, could have paid the property taxes this year - let me tell you, that is reassuring!
    With 5 Nubian dairy goats and 20 or so chickens there are the daily chores. And a bit of beefing up the fencing after one of my bucks got in with the three does last month. Thank heavens only one doe was in heat...but now looking for some deserving 4-h kids that would like some free babies from awesome milk lines come May (unless things look real grim on the economic front - then I will keep them). When my "hay guy" delivered this week asked him about possible kids that might want goats and he volunteered to take the pregnant goat to his farm before she gives birth since he has tons of hay and big pastures of free hay to feed her and the babies til we can find homes for them - in exchange for one of the babies to add their genetics to his wife's her...so I won't have to buy extra. My second buck is already hanging out with his wife's does for the winter so they will also have babies.
    And tonight will go to my sisters and dig out all my yellow, black and red raspberries from her big chest freezer to start making jams this weekend during some expected bad weather.
    And in between bigger projects, always cleaning, packaging and labeling seeds I saved last summer.
    PlantLady

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  29. Hey all of your stocking up sounds great, but
    I hate to rain on your parade.Do you have
    enought for seven years. And what happens when
    the sun does not shine for a 1/4 part of the
    day. And all green grass is burnt up and 1/3 of
    the trees are burnt up.Couple with the ecomy
    downturn and you have mass starvation.
    What is my source. the book of revelation
    Blessings
    Debby

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    1. What's your point? We should do nothing?
      Hard times could be just that--Hard Times not a Biblical occurance SuccotashRose

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    2. Humanity has been through truly awful times that weren't the end of the world. Hard times have happened before, and until the Second Coming, they'll happen again. If the world ends an hour from now, none of us (in the Lord) will need to worry. If it doesn't, and a really hard tomorrow comes, better we be prepared than not. We'll keep going until God tells us to stop.

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    3. I've been prepping for years, and would not be in a position to retire if I had not been. Meanwhile my preps got me through times between jobs. PREP for hard times and live better now.

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    4. When this happens..."the sun does not shine for a 1/4 part of the day. And all green grass is burnt up and 1/3 of
      the trees are burnt up...", I think the last thing any of us has to worry about is an economic downturn - cause by that point there won't be an economy anywhere! (hehe)

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  30. $20 trillion is an enormous amount of money. We will never pay it back or even pay it down and I don't thiink anyone in Washington expects to ever pay it down/off. When interest rates return to normal of about 6% the payment on $20 trillion is so large that we will not be able to pay it and we will at some point default. Consider also that it is probable that interest rates will exceed 6% making it all more likely. Finally there is the third leg of this looming disaster; we refuse to live within our budget and we are hooked on borrowing $600 billion to a trillion every year. We can't break that habit and it is going to be a disaster when we are unable to borrow.

    What this all means is the mother of all great depressions is ominous and we cannot avoid it. We can put it off by borrowing and printing money but this only makes the inevitable crash worse. IMHO that is the SHTF event to prep for.

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  31. Hi Patrice,
    MyOhMy! There are some very busy people out there! Down here in Yuma, living in our 5th wheel, there is not a lot of 'preping' to be done. But some things are just second nature. In our travels, we always are on the look out for off the road water sources. Then I take a look at the soil because I always have a years worth of seeds ready if needed. We also keep up with food storage, probably 6 months or so if we are careful. Being aware of our surroundings and the possibilities in each location keeps us sharp. I also started a 'fiber arts' group here in the RV park we are working at. It always helps to spread the knowledge around! We always know our way home, but face the reality that we might not be able to get there, and will have to just bloom where we are planted. Stay frosty folks! Trump can't solve all our problems, but he may be able to get us through this. Shalom!
    Judy, not in Idaho!

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  32. I think most would say we didn't really do any prepping. Not in that physical sense anyway. We went to mass as a family and confession... prepping for the eternal instead of the temporal. We're tying to buy a house closer to church so we can go spend more time with Christ. We buried my grandmother which brings it all very clearly into view that you can prep physically all you want but in the end I think *I* need to do more prepping for the eternal.

    Learning in NY

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    1. I pray for comfort and strength for you and your family during this difficult time.

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  33. God bless Don, Patrice, and her family. A couple thoughts... I'm not so sure Mr. Trump buys a nation "under judgement" any time at all. Sure, the markets are up and some have Trump-Inspired optimism...however, the "left" is now even more unhinged, the globalists are reeling, and the Obamanation continues his dastardly work to the last second. I can't say with certainty that either "candidate" affected the time-line of what's coming...just don't think they have that kind of "control", so keep prepping!

    Community is indeed the "third leg" - and it's importance cannot be understated. I recently spoke with some folks who were worrying about their rather shady neighbors. I came away feeling greatly blessed to have good neighbors. Though we're all of different "faiths", we're united in our love of Christ, and our love for each other. We brake bread together from time to time and pray with and FOR one another. It is a sweet experience that defies adequate expression. We're not Wesley-Rawles "commando" group - perhaps somewhere between that and say "Hogans's Heroes"... Together, we are preparing, individually as inspired and according to our gifts, and mutually in consultation to serve and protect our families and others. Together we'll meet the road ahead - shoulder to shoulder when necessary, and on bended knee importuning the protection of heaven. What an incredible source of comfort this is! I hope other "preppers" and "redoubters" are doing likewise.

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  34. I realize we're well past Friday, but here it is anyway. I spent last Friday prepping for a potential ice storm here in the midwest. We moved into a new home 6 months ago, so each storm is a new experience here. Fortunately our old home, which we still own, is only about 4 miles away. We still have some things there, so I popped over and raided the basement of our longterm bottled water supply and and some extra firewood and emergency candles. I found it very helpful to spend a lot of time in thought about our new home and analyze how to respond to a longterm power outage. If we lose power, we lose heat, so I decided which rooms would be closed off and how we could successfully "live" in only one room. We have a small fireplace, but in reality it isn't practical for actually heating the house. Fortunately the storm passed just south of us by only about 15-20 miles and all we got was a little drizzle. But I feel better knowing that I've made the mental plans and thought things through.

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