Country Living Series

Monday, October 21, 2013

Odd and uneasy undercurrents

I bought a couple of bags of black-eyed peas last week.


Black-eyed peas are a very tasty bean, one we all enjoy. But they're a warm-weather crop and we can't grow them here in north Idaho. Therefore I like to keep some on hand.

Why?

To explain, let me digress slightly and discuss one of my favorite novels, The Far Pavillions by M.M. Kaye, which takes place in 19th century India. The story opens shortly before the Indian Rebellion (sometimes called the Sepoy Mutiny) of 1857. Concerning that event, consider a couple of passages:

"Akbar Khan had many friends in Delhi, and normally he would have wished to linger there. But this year he was aware of odd and uneasy undercurrents, and the conversation of his friends disturbed him. The city was full of strange rumors and there was tension and an ominous sense of suppressed excitement in the narrow, noisy streets and crowded bazaars. It gave him a sharp feeling of apprehension and an awareness of impending evil."

The main character of the book, Ashton, is four years old at the time of the Mutiny. Both he and his Hindu foster-mother Sita are caught up in the brutal events that took place during the Rebellion and are forced to flee, hiding in jungles and trudging through remote villages in search of a safe haven. The author describes their situation as follows: "But many who must reap the whirlwind [the aftermath of the Mutiny] were as blameless and bewildered as Sita and Ash-Baba, blown helplessly before the gale like two small and insignificant sparrows on a wild day of storm."


These two passages strike me strongly every time I read them. In the first passage, Akbar Khan is wise enough to note the ominous rumble beneath his feet, and he and his party respond by leaving Delhi and heading for the high Himalayan passes. ["A Prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it." -- Proverbs 22:3]

In the second passage, it illustrates how bad things can happen to good people. Sita and Ash are two small and insignificant sparrows, unprepared for the violence that kills thousands of people over many months. Sita and Ash did nothing to deserve the life-changing events they had to live through as a result of the actions of others.

I can't help but draw parallels to today.

Are you feeling "odd and uneasy undercurrents" swirling around? I know I am. I don't know what the future holds in America, but it concerns me. I have a sense of urgency to put our ducks in order -- finalize the garden, make some improvements in our farm infrastructure, and in general try to make the homestead more self-sufficient.



It's not just me. I've heard others who also sense that something is coming. Nobody knows what, but a lot of people just have a general sense of... dread? concern? uncertainty? Call it what you will.

A couple weeks ago a comment on a news article caught my eye. It read: "Folks, whether you are getting government program assistance or not, PLANT GARDENS....plant everything and anything you can....in jars, in pots, in your basement, in your garage...in your house, on top of the house....in garden houses, in cold frames....wherever, however....starting planting now.....and learn to can food. The sky will fall when people on government programs cannot get food to eat. We must make sure that we all eat and have shelter. No matter what you think is normal routine life....do not ignore the necessity to provide for the future. Doesn't matter how much money you have...the money may not be available. Don't rely on food stores as the prices are skyrocketing. Need Plans B and C for survival."

A little incoherent, perhaps; but you can certainly sense this person's urgency.

Last week on Zero Hedge, there was a startling article called They're Coming for Your Savings. To quote: "Will more countries introduce capital controls or asset confiscations in the next few years? Duh, of course. Debt levels are unmanageable, so they have to be lowered. And there are only three ways to do it: deflationary collapse that wipes out the debt through default, inflation that wipes out the debt by destroying the world’s major currencies, or stealing enough private sector wealth to reset the clock. Option one – depression – is political poison so will be avoided at all costs. Option two is being tried and is failing because the deflationary effect of trillions of dollars of bad debt more or less equals the inflationary impact of trillions of dollars of new currency.

That just leaves door number three, demonize the successful and take what they’ve accumulated. Recall from the historical list that opened this post that governments like to pick on members of society who 1) have lots of money and 2) have lots of enemies or can easily be framed for crimes. This time around it will be “the rich” who are living well at the expense of the rest of us. The trick will be to define 'rich' down far enough to make possible the confiscation of middle-class IRAs and 401(K)s, since that’s where the real money is."


Yes, odd and uneasy undercurrents. A couple extra sacks of beans -- rather than a savings account -- sounds like a pretty good idea right now.

47 comments:

  1. I couldn't agree more. I have felt this way for a long time but when I articulate these thoughts people look at me like I have 2 heads. Too many weird things are going on. Too many to just be coincidences. Keep your powder dry.

    Huggs..

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  2. The Far Pavilions.....it is a wonderful book and I was pleased to hear someone else who read it.

    Yes there seems to be an unease in the air. Ralph and I are in Virginia and despite all the news that the economy is getting better, the bakery where he works has cut back on hours and dropped shifts. Belt tightening and unsure markets. A neighbor got laid off from a job he held for 15 years. We all garden and this year grew bigger gardens!

    Ralph and I inventoried our pantry and cold room. Decent but not what it should be. We love your blog, please keep the wonderful real life articles up..thank you.
    Sincerely

    Fiona in Virginia

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  3. Agreed!

    We too love BE Peas. And here is our favorite BE Pea recipe.
    It is an appetizer recipe, but we also enjoy it over rice with a hunk of cornbread on the side.
    In the past I have doubled or quadrupled the recipe and canned the excess for easy serving at a later date. It also freezes beautifully (name that movie)

    Here you go!

    Black Eyed Pea Dip
    From Neiman Marcus’ Pure and Simple

    About ½ pound dried black eyed peas (frozen are good too, canned tastes very flat)
    8 slices bacon*
    2 stalks celery, finely chopped
    ¼ cup green bell pepper, finely chopped
    1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped
    2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    ½ t black pepper
    2 T Tabasco sauce, or to taste
    ½ C Ketchup
    3 cubes chicken bouillon, crushed
    ¼ t nutmeg
    ¼ t cinnamon
    1 can (14.5 oz) Rotel tomatoes with green chilies, chopped – if not available, add 1 small canned chopped chilies to can of tomatoes
    2 T oil
    3 T flour

    Soak peas overnight or 4 hours. Put soaked peas in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook or 30 minutes, or until just tender.
    To avoid having lots of dirty pots, I do this step in a pot rather than a skillet -- Cook bacon until crisp. Set bacon aside, drain 1-2 teaspoons of the grease and reserve. Add celery, bell pepper, onion, and garlic to bacon drippings and sauté until soft.
    Make a paste of ketchup, bouillon, black pepper, nutmeg, cinnamon, and Tabasco. Add to sautéed vegetables. Add cooked peas and tomatoes with chilies. Cook 30 minutes on very low heat. It is ok if some of the beans break up, you want this to happen. Just don’t let it cook too high or you’ll end up with a “mush”, it tastes the same, just doesn’t look as nice!
    Mix reserved bacon grease and flour together. Cook on stove or microwave until it starts to bubble, this is your roux. Add roux to pea mixture and cook an additional 10 minutes or until thickened. Remove from heat and transfer to serving dish.
    Crumble bacon over top and serve with tortilla chips.
    Can be served cold or reheats well. Freezes well too. Serves 2-16, depending on how hungry you are.

    *Omit bacon for vegetarians, add bacos or liquid smoke if you wish. Sauté vegetables in olive oil.

    These are my changes to the original recipe, I’ve found this is less salty and has a MUCH lower heat.

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  4. Good post. I would say a good 98% of the US population has no clue and doesn't care to get one. I know. I work outside the home, and I continually see how people are too concerned over the Amish Mafia (For rea! LOL) in lieu of their finances and well being. It will be a very sad day for them.

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    1. I bet 98% is very close to reality. I've given up trying to wake up those back East. The last two phone calls were great examples of their mindsets. Both calls exhibited euphoria. One due to the purchase of an expen$ive antique hot rod, the other because the Red Sox will be in the World Series.

      The bread and games will soon dry up just as they did in the fall of Rome. History has recorded time and time again what follows when people refuse to see. It's sad...
      Montana Guy

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  5. We have been doing this for years. One other thing have black powder weapons and stuff to make your own powder and rounds. Also a good crossbow. We live on deer, and raise chickens etc..

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  6. Patrice, We need to barter. I'll send my Black-eyed peas and you send down apples and wheat to Texas.

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  7. Like Thomas Jefferson said, "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Everything changed on January 1, 2012. With a stroke of a pen (NDAA) Obama destroyed our Bill of Rights. Four months later the Feds announced that 30,000 drones will be unleashed over American soil. Anyone who still clings to the belief that Washington DC can be fixed is in my opinion, a fool.

    The best advice for Americans to protect their loved ones can be found right here on Patrice's Web site, and on Enola Gay's and James Wesley Rawles' sites. But remember, knowledge without action is worthless.
    Montana Guy

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    1. Very well said, Montana Guy.

      Lisa the Farm Lady
      from Six Pines Farm in Canada

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  8. I guess I have a disease. I have been concerned for over 40 years. I know this because I just broke open a 22lr brick that I paid $9 for way back when. I just wish I could find any 22lr now. I have also started re reading a book the coming great depression of 1990. Everything that is discussed is still going on / a problem. Who would have thought the USA could have kicked the can down the road so far.

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  9. Stress from worrying about all the incidences and actions this rogue administration is doing only add to peoples problems.Many know and feel the undercurrents of disaster blowing our way. I try to tell everyone who worries about every thing going on is this.Concentrate only on the things you can directly control and manipulate in your life.The info you receive is great for heads up but 99% of it is beyond mine and your control.Make your preparations as best you can and if you have not prepared for the tsunami that is being directed at America and Americans best get moving.In the coming days we will see the very best and the very very worse of mankind.The administrations obsession with electrical power is concerning.We have been warned of EMP,coronal ejection and sabotage of power systems. A grid shutdown exercise is being planned in the very near future. Me thinks they protest too much and will use a power down scenario to shut our nation down. Easiest and swiftest way to deep six our way of life in every aspect and facet. Prepare for it.Good luck and God Bless to all....

    had enuff

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  10. I know that feeling well and I am not ignoring it. I am preparing food and other supplies as quickly as possible. I have learned over the years to trust my instincts and this time they are saying pick up the pace and prep even more.

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  11. Kudos Patrice, for giving a great example of learning from history and applying it to today. I've never read that book, but have it on my list. Thank you for your blog. I look forward to reading it (and learning from y'all) every day.

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  12. I feel it, and have for a while, but this sense of a pressure cooker coming to steam seems to be picking up speed. This year we have really focused in on putting some storage food away, canning all the garden excess we could, raising pigs and harvesting deer. Since both of us have families that choose to remain oblivious, we feel added pressure to communicate the need to them- we can't support everyone in two extended families. I am very concerned for all of us and for our great country. We are rapidly reaching the tipping point.

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  13. You dont have to be a weatherman to know when dark clouds are gathering , and thunder is heard , that there is a storm a coming. There is a storm on the horizon and its heading our way.

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  14. I know what you mean. Before we left the farm to come back to the city (not a real city, just more than 200 people sharing a Post Office), I planted extra beets, rutabagas and parsnips. I just had that sense that the garden needed to be full of things that would grow NOW. I plan to spend most of November and December there rather than be tense here where DH works.

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  15. I think (and feel) you're right about this, Patrice.

    I would only add that the biggest target group at this stage appears to be the entire population of "evil, greedy, over-the-hill, dangerous constitution-loving" baby boomers, and specifically the ones who are white.

    This is coincidentally the segment of the population with the most to loot, whether they fall into the category of wealthy or not.

    It's not unreasonable to think there's gonna be hell to pay for a lot of innocent people, and it could commence at any next moment or event.

    It's also not unreasonable to think the vast majority of folks aren't going to be ready for it.

    Time to stock up on jars and Tattlers, and to plant plant plant. Like the commenter you quoted above put it:

    ""Folks, whether you are getting government program assistance or not, PLANT GARDENS....plant everything and anything you can....in jars, in pots, in your basement, in your garage...in your house, on top of the house....in garden houses, in cold frames....wherever, however....starting planting now.....and learn to can food."

    And pray without ceasing.

    A.McSp

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  16. Patrice,
    Where did you get the beans? Azure or a grocery store?
    Thanks.

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    1. I got them at Cash & Carry, a wholesale grocery in Spokane. They're a regional chain -- here's the link:
      https://www.smartfoodservice.com/

      - Patrice

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    2. I believe the poster is referring to azure farms, a very good source for many things.

      Here's the link: azurestandard.com


      A.McSp

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  17. That's funny you say that. I just told Mom and Mike the other day "I feel like something is going to happen and we need to be ready!" Not sure when or what I do too feel like it's coming.

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    1. Hi Tawra!

      Folks, go see Tawra's website, it's REALLY cool:

      Living On a Dime
      http://www.livingonadime.com/

      - Patrice

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    2. Another good book is frugal housewife, or housewives. I downloaded it free to my kiindle. Has helped me save hundreds of dollars so far.

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    3. Upbeat and practical. I like it.

      Thanks!

      A.McSp

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  18. Where do you find black eyed peas sold in bulk like that!?

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    1. I got them at Cash & Carry, a wholesale grocery in Spokane. They're a regional chain -- here's the link:
      https://www.smartfoodservice.com/

      - Patrice

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    2. Depending on what part of the country you live in, azure farms is an outstanding source. They have routes in many places now. It's easy to find out if your region is on one of them.

      Here's the link: azurestandard.com

      A. McSp

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  19. If you have never seen Dr Zhivago, the one released in the 60's, rent it. It is a good movie but more then that it is a very revealing story of what to expect. How things turn around 180 degrees and how long it can take before things "get better". It won't be identical of course but I'm betting many of the events will indeed be identical.

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  20. And does anyone believe that someone (agency) will be at the door to collect your food savings to share with the others? If so, how do you plan on keeping your savings safe? Also, when whatever happens, are we all planning on reusing canning flat lids or stock up now?

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    1. yes , someone from some Government agency will probably be at some peoples homes. Good luck in trying to find the bulk of mine. Reusing canning lids is not a good idea, that's why most of us here on this blog stock up on Tattler lids. Seems to me that I have responded to you before.. I do not believe that cynic's will do well in the coming days. . I will pray for you that Our Lord will also bless you with the wisdom you will need to prepare for the coming rough times.

      Dee, in the American Southwest

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    2. This too was covered in the Doctor Zhivago movie. The doctor moved back into his families house after the revolution and the "committee" put six other families in their witrh them AND a committee monitor to make sure no one had anything that was not available to everyone. From each according to their ability and to each ccording to their needs.

      I worked with an immigrant from the Ukraine who came here in the 50's. His family, before he was born, went through the holodamor in the Ukraine in 32-33. His grandfather saw it coming and choose to bury some of their meager crop of beet and other roots in a nearby wooded area. As I understand it he did this 2-3 years in a row so the first time he did it there was no reason to and he could have become discouraged. After all they worked hard and storing up some food in a half dozen hiding places was more work. But in the fall of 1932 the Russian army came in and went house to house and confiscated food and other necessities. Yu had no choice they came in and ransacked the place and took what they wanted which for most people was everything. The intent was to allow the people to die in the long cold winter from starvation. Al travel was restricted and the only chice was to stay at home and slowly starve to death. His family would recount the story many times to him and his brother and sister. Many survivied but more the 8 million died. One other part of the story was that he had an aunt and his mother living in that small family home and when grandfather saw that the Russian soldiers were coming to confiscate food the two women were hidden in the forest for a couple of weeks. The grand father and grandmother and this man's father stayed home to deal with the army. This was all because the army would also rape the women in their search for food. He didn't say what hapened to his grandmother but in his many stories about his family I had this picture of very tough people who could survive great hardships so I suspect his grandmother was a tough old lady who refused to hide.

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    3. That is one of my big concerns as well; how to keep everything safe when the government comes knocking. Here in Canada we do not actually have "private property". This means that as per our Charter of "rights" the government can come along any time and without explanation and take your land for their own use. Yep, even if you bought the place outright.
      I would love to see some suggestions on how we can keep our food/supplies safe. We have large dogs but are still waiting on our gun licenses. And how does one keep their cash safe? Thanks for any suggestions and advice.
      Lisa the Farm Lady
      Six Pines Farm in Canada

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    4. A friend put wheat, rice, sugar and other long term storage food in mylar bags and then into 5 gal buckets. He buried these in a well drained area of his yard and then put a cheap metal storage shed over the spot. He told me if he never needs it that he will never dig it up but if he does need it that it would be very unlikely anyone would have thought to move the old shed and dig up the ground undr it so it will still be there.
      Money/cash may in the near future become an issue. When a country enconters serious economic problems it usually has to devalue it's currency and print new bills. This gives them a lot of power to control YOUR money. They will automatically convert your savings and investments value and you will be allowed to turn n your old cash for the new devalued cash. But it's common that they don't allow very large amounts to be converted and in fact having a large amount of cash in such perilous times might make you subject to legal/criminal sanctions. It is not uncmmn to make it illegal to own gold and maybe even silver and you will be required to sell it to the government at a price they determine. There is one loophole that usually survives and that is silver coins and possibly gold coins as well. Not "rounds" but real coins that were minted by your contry or a nearby Democratic country. Buy old Candian or American silver coins and save them for the possibility of a economic collapse. Hopefully the comming collpase will not be as bad as some historical collapses. Either way silver coins would be a good investment. A loaf of bread today is worth about a (silver) dime. Even in the event of runaway inflation and a subsequent devaluation it is probable that a loaf of bread will still be worth a silver dime more or less. Gold coins have there place but they are difficult to actually use in the event of a SHTF situation. That is if youwanted to buy a loaf of bread and all you had was a one ounce gold coin how would the person selling you the bread make change.

      Guns in Canada are problematic. Can't you buy and own a shotgun? How about a decent pellet rifle. Pellet rifles are effective in taking small game. Consider a bow and arrow. Some preppers actually love bows and arrows for when TSHTF. There is a slingshot version that will shoot arrows. Here in the states black powder rifles that operate using flint or percussion caps are not heavily regulated perhaps Canada has some leeway for "antique" arms.

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  21. I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. Rev.3:15,16

    Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; Titus 2:13

    Remember therefore how thou hast received and heard, and hold fast, and repent. If therefore thou shalt not watch. I will come on thee as a thief, and thou shalt not know what hour I will come upon thee. Rev. 3:3

    This is most important of all!

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  22. Hubby and I are committing a leap of faith at a time when we both feel as you do, Patrice. We are planning on his retirement and the home we want to build. We have a great place, in the mountains in the redoubt, but we get 8+ months of snow. This year it may be more as snow began in September, not October.
    We had an occasion while visiting a friend in a state north of us, to come upon a parcel of land that is just the size we were looking for, had water on it, a well all ready in and good dirt. We are now in progress to buy it, for "someday". We don't have this kind of cash, but are taking it out of the equity of our paid for home. I'd be lying to tell you I'm not terrified, but both of us felt like this was something we had to do. Prayerfully. We look forward to a bigger garden and the ability to grow foods that take longer. It's on the east side of a valley and they have yet to get snow, while our garden was snowed out in September. It's currently making some income as the owner has allowed the neighbor to run his horses there. We'll continue to do so.
    I keep telling myself, Trust and Obey, and pray to do God's will, not mine. As hard as I try to find a reason to NOT risk financial ruin, both hubby and I feel like this is meant to be. It may be just a place we end up in our camper growing a large garden.
    HOWEVER, our closing date is in December (not set by us) which gave me some peace of mind due to the gov. testing the grid in Nov. I guess if everything fails, we won't be able to close on the property.
    I'd like to second, or third, those posters that put in a plug for Azure standard products in general and the beans specifically. We had the northern beans last week and they were the absolute very best creamy, non gritty, tasty beans we've ever had.
    sidetracksusie

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    1. Good luck with your soon-to be new home, Susie!

      Lisa the Farm Lady
      Six Pines Farm in Canada

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    2. Thank you, Lisa. We are early on in this adventure and it may not come to fruition. We just found out today a friend of our is planning to do the same as we are, at about the same time and to the same location.
      Thank you, again.
      sidetracksusie

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  23. This is a difficult subject for me. Our daughter has leukemia and we feel the need to save up enough to cover our maximum out of pocket deductible for next year which is going up, as well as our monthly premium for health insurance. We try to add other things here and there as we are able - books, food, medicine - but some larger purchases like a pressure canner or Berkly water filter will have to wait. We are eligible for government assistance due to my daughter's diagnosis but chose not to take it. Each needs asses their own household's needs. God's grace on us all...

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    1. Bless you and your family, Eileen. One major illness cn wipe out a lot of plans. Prayers for you.

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    2. GB you and your family, Eileen. We don't face the same trials as you, but are on a limited income. He will provide, trust me! I wanted an old fashioned percolater, and was yard/garage saling like crazy and coming up empty handed...and all of a sudden, I found one at local thrift store! and couple days later, another one! (which I gave to my sisinlaw) plus I also got a smaller one at another time...decided I wanted to can, similar situation....nothing...then one day, folks up the street having yard sale, hubby grabbed one...and they came to my house a little while later with a second one! I got 2 good Presto canners for under $20 bucks! Yeah, one needs a new guage, but the gaskets seem decent. So keep the faith, Eileen! He's watching over us, and helping us even if we don't realize it!

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  24. I'm going to mount up on my favorite hobby horse and ride that pony for a lil' while here. Become familiar with edible wild foods in your area! Stinging nettles, cooked, are highly nutritious greens. Cut, they're a nutritious forage for your livestock. Poke greens (young, not old), lambs quarter, cattails, dandelion greens, dollar weed...all yummy. All foraged. Know the trees in your area so that you can forage nuts in the fall, including acorns and pine nuts. I figure that if things get bad and there is a confiscation effort of "hoarded" foods, then knowledge of the wild alternatives would be a good thing to have. Plantain, purslane, clover...goodness, all of these would be good things to have in your "lawn". Only you have to know that your raggedy lawn has more nutritious edibles in it than your garden.

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    1. We "discovered" purslane and miner's lettuce this year and how yummy they are. I second your advice!
      sidetracksusie

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  25. It seems to me that the average person reading your blog has a bucket full of common sense! Being prepared for the storms ahead as our fore-bearers did is a good thing. Unfortunately, it has some disadvantages that I have recently, through reading, come to realize. I am not talking about skills.

    My husband and I have a large skill set, and while not all encompassing, we are in a better position than average. The problem, however, is the reality of history.

    We may think that the average American in the 1860's was self sufficient and reliant, but that wasn't the case. The North was dependent upon their factories and businesses, and the South was dependent upon imports and their cash cow aka cotton. The Southern belles also had limited skills. They certainly made do, and worked at many solutions, but the song, "There's a hole in the bucket" applies here. Foraging, eating indigenous plants and animals? By the end of the war, Confederate butchers had dressed rat in their window...if they could find any. Cut your own firewood from the surrounding forest? Not when there is no transportation. Many would say that the South never recovered. The Federal and Confederate governments had confiscation laws and used them. Enough said.

    Recently, I watched "Wartime Farm," a BBC series on life for the British farmer in WW2. I thoroughly enjoyed the series, but was aghast at what the government did to the farmers. Due to the German blockade, the government took control of the farms. This meant that they dictated what could or could not be done on the farms. Lack of compliance meant that they would take over the farm and remove the farmers and their family by force. One poor gent had a shoot out and died. They became more and more restrictive over the war years. By wars end and into the 50's, just about everything was rationed and controlled.

    Uneasy undercurrents? Certainly seems that way.


    Odd and uneasy undercurrents? Yes.

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    1. But it was for the common good don'tcha know. I would bet you that when the government needed to use it's heavy hand to force farmers or anyone to comply that 95% of the people agreed it was the right thing to do. That is the whole purpose of Alinsky's rules for radicals i.e. that they want to overppower the system and make it crash. Then in the crisis people will willingly give up rights for safety. What are food stamps, welfare, obamacare, uncontrolled illegal immigration for if not to crash the system. When it crashes and people are starving and rioting our federal government will come to the rescue and make everyone comply with the new world order "for the common good". Make your plans now and don't plan on openly fighting it. Don't get me wrong I have the greatest respect for our founding fathers and others in our history who gave their all and sometimes their lives to give us the greatest country in the world. If you are willing and able to do that I praise you. However if you "merely" want to survive you need to prepare but expect to also have to "go along to get along". Opsec will be critical because your preps may be viewed as community property to be shared. I don't want to sound greedy but for some/many in the future your preps could be the difference between surviving or becoming a nameless statistic. My parents were married in the depths of the great depression and the subject of the depression was common dinner table discussion when I was growing up. One of the most enlightening thing I ever took away from it was this: I asked why didn't you do more, prepare more early on? The answer was that no one knew what was happening, how bad it would get or how long it would last. The governmentkept saying positive things and everyone thought it would e over in a few months. But it got worse and worse and went on for 11 years more or less only finally ending because of the war and the enormous buildup which brought full employment. In the end the government didn't end it, all the programs that you hear about helped a handful of people and even then most of those had to have the right political connections. My point is to survive the coming great reset you will have to be smart, expect the worst, be a little devious and stretch your assets out for the long term. I don't know what is going to happen or how bad it will get. No one can know this with any certainty. But I'm not going to make the mistake of thinking it will be over quickly or not be very serious.

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    2. I agree with you 100 % My parents and my husband lived during the great depression and they have said the same thing your parents did that no one really saw it coming or knew the depths to which it would go .

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  26. I agree with what was said about the feeling of dread I have felt it for awhile now but here is a bit of what I guess you could call scuttlebutt , someone that I know ,( I won't use names) were storing rice and beans and other staples that they use to help feed their many farm hands who live and work on the older couples farm .Some how some supposed government people heard and arrived at the couples home and said that they had been informed that the couple were stock piling food and when the couple tried to explain the two "agents" confiscated all of the couples stores except what the agents thought they would need . I know these people and they are just plain country folk who were trying to save a little money and take care of their workers .Be careful when doing anything cause you never know when this could happen to you .

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