Country Living Series

Monday, September 24, 2012

Snapshot of a country kitchen

I did some canning yesterday, and at one point I noticed what looked like a typical snapshot of a country kitchen: a bowl of drying basil leaves from the garden, fresh-baked bread, some newly-canned tomatoes, and apples in the process of being canned.


I didn't even have to rearrange anything to make it more "photogenic." This is just how it looked.

Until I trashed the kitchen with dirty dishes, of course. Then it looked a whole lot different. That's why I took this snapshot while I could.

11 comments:

  1. I typically don't have the fresh bread but it is a scene that you would see especially around canning time. Also I am seeing more and more people using Tattler lids so they are becoming typical as well!

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  2. I love it. Looks so warm and inviting!

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  3. Would you mind sharing your bread recipe? (I searched what I could on the blog, and didn't find it...I *did* find that you use a bread machine- which makes me even MORE interested in your recipe!) Thank you!!

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    1. That's easy, as I have it memorized:

      14 oz. warm water
      1 1/2 teaspoons salt
      2 tablespoons sugar (or honey)
      2 tablespoons butter or margarine
      2 cups white flour
      1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
      2/3 cup thin-cut oatmeal
      1 1/2 teaspoons yeast

      On my bread machine, I use the "dark loaf" setting, which takes 3 hrs 20 minutes.

      - Patrice

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    2. Oh Thank you!!! (and by "thin cut" oatmeal, do you mean the "old fashioned" rolled oats, as compared to Steel cut oats?)

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    3. On second thought, it doesn't matter what kind of oatmeal you use (we tend to buy the rolled oats, which is what I meant by thin-cut, as opposed to the thicker, steel-cut oats).

      - Patrice

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    4. Gotcha~ Thanks again! (and I am learning alot from your e-booklets on canning...)

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  4. You are my canning guru! Just curious: do you have a clever use for the "juice" that you will eventually pour off of your canned apple bits? Would it be tasty to drink, chilled?

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    1. Can't see why not. Couldn't hurt, at any rate.

      - Patrice

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  5. You can make apple juice or apple jelly by cooking down the peelings and then using the resulting liquid for juice or jelly and can it up. If you do not have time to do it during the crazy canning season, you can put the peels in the freezer and then thaw and cook them when you have time (as if that ever happens).
    Paintedmoose

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  6. Your basil still looks green. How do you manage that? Every time my mom or I try and dry basil it turns black and unappitizing and somehow looses it's flavor... Any thoughts?

    By the way we love your blog and I've done several of your recipies!

    Thanks for your help.

    Stacy

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