Country Living Series

Monday, September 12, 2016

Strawberry photos

These photos are potential illustrations for an article on strawberries for Backwoods Home Magazine. They are posted so the editor can choose which ones she wants.

Photo 1 (low resolution only): Our first strawberry bed


Photo 2 (low resolution only): Our first strawberry bed after the deer found it


Photo 3 (low resolution only): Netting the strawberries with a bird-net "teepee"


Photo 4 (low resolution only): The deer pushes aside the base of the netting and ate the plants


Photo 5 (low resolution only): Robins discover the strawberries, growing in tire beds


Photo 6 (low resolution only): Netting the strawberry tires


Photo 7 (low resolution only): Netting the strawberry tires


Photo 8 (low resolution only): Netted strawberry beds on a misty morning


Photo 9 (low resolution only): Snake caught in the netting (we freed it, don't worry)


Photo 10 (low resolution only): Snake caught in the netting


Photo 11 (high resolution): Chipmunk eating a strawberry


Photo 12 (high resolution): Pineberries sending out runners


Photo 13 (high resolution): Pineberries sending out runners


Photo 14 (high resolution): Pineberries sending out runners


Photo 15 (high resolution): Pineberries sending out runners


Photo 16 (high resolution): Pineberries runners, close up


Photo 17 (low resolution only): Picking strawberries


Photo 18 (high resolution)


Photo 19 (low resolution only): One of our ever-bearing beds (June-bearing tires in the background)


Photo 20 (low resolution only): Ten tires of June-bearing strawberries


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Photo 22 (low resolution only): Examples of huge strawberries


Photo 23 (high resolution): Examples of huge strawberries


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Photo 26 (high resolution)


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Photo 39 (low resolution only): Bagged up and ready to freeze


Photo 40 (low resolution only): Strawberry cheesecake trifle


Photo 41 (low resolution only): Making fruit leather


Photo 42 (low resolution only): Making fruit leather


Photo 43 (high resolution): Fruit leather in the morning sun


Photo 44 (low resolution): Fruit leather rolled up in waxed paper, ready to freeze


Photo 45 (high resolution): Strawberry shortcake

20 comments:

  1. Boy - now am I hungry! Great photos AND great strawberries.

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  2. Patrice, has your email address changed? I have sent a couple of messages---maybe you have just been busy. Linna

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    Replies
    1. Yes, sorry, I saw your email but it got buried in a couple hundred others. I'll dig out eventually.

      - Patrice

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  3. Did i miss it or did you say how many pounds of strawberries you have picked?

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  4. Fantastic! You know, I've never had strawberry fed venison. Mount a trail camera, have Don guard the patch. Voila!

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  5. what type of strawberries are these? I remember reading that they were bare root. May I ask where you purchased these from? I had some in a bed for almost 3 years with nary a single berry :(

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    Replies
    1. Yes, bare-root, both the ever-bearing and the June-bearing. I usually buy from Stark Bros.

      - Patrice

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  6. Beautiful plants! Did you fertilize throughout the season or is it just your natural compost? My strawberry plants never look that good. I miss fresh strawberries already. Won't buy them in the stores.

    Debra

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    Replies
    1. We've never fertilized. Initially we filled the tires with a combo of compost, topsoil, and sand. I'll probably add another layer of compost next spring.

      - Patrice

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  7. I just had a PB&J with my homemade strawberry jam. It's nice to be able to preserve that summer-goodness, and enjoy it all year long.

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  8. I just had a PB&J with my homemade strawberry jam. It's nice to be able to preserve that summer-goodness, and enjoy it all year long.

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  9. Beautiful! My favorite berry. So hungry now...

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  10. Your strawberries are/were beautiful. The only photo I didn't like was #40 - made be so very hungry & I just had breakfast! I really like the animal & strawberry photos - something everyone who hasn't grown strawberries needs to know.

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  11. Beautiful strawberries! wow 160 lbs! Thats alot of picking strawberries. So when you say they are ever bearing strawberries what does that mean? all summer or the whole year? June-bearing I'm assuming is just blooming earlier but mostly in June?

    Your strawberries look delicious. I picked a couple little handfuls off my mother inlaws strawberries that we planted a few years ago.

    Just curious how many tires you have planted with strawberries?
    from SE idaho

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    Replies
    1. Ever-bearers produce a decent crop in June, then continue to bear in lesser amounts during the whole summer. It's early September right now and I'm noticing some berries are still ripening. By contrast, June-bearers produce a heavy crop during about a three- or four-week period in June, then pffft! That's it. They quit.

      We have ten tires of June-bearers, and two raised beds of ever-bearers. We also planted two tires of pineberries (white strawberries) as an experiment, so hopefully those will bear fruit next summer.

      - Patrice

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  12. We had a huge black snake get caught in some netting in our barn several years ago. He was after the baby Phoebes who had just hatched. We were able to free him and took him waaaaaaaay down into the woods. He didn't return, at least that we know of.
    Kay

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  13. Strawberry fields forever...

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  14. Love the new cover photo! The picture almost looks green screened! Great shot!

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