Country Living Series

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Saying goodbye to another daughter

Don and I are proud to announce Younger Daughter's recent career decision: She has enlisted in the Navy.


Let me tell you how this came about.

Younger Daughter has always wanted to travel, and was trying to think of some career excuse to do so. The Navy seemed like a good choice. Don is a Navy vet, and while over the years he's talked about his time in the service, he never ever suggested it as a choice for either of our girls.

In other words, Younger Daughter reached this decision entirely on her own. She thought about it for several months and researched it extensively before letting us know (and her decision took us totally by surprise).

She narrowed the job selection down to several possible choices for a four- or five-year enlistment, and made an appointment to see a recruiter the same day she took her algebra final exam in early May. She promised us if the jobs she wanted weren’t available, she would “walk” and not enlist, at least not yet. Since she wants to travel, she wanted to be on a ship (not land-based), so that was part of her selection process.


On the day of her algebra final she only got about four hours’ sleep (upset stomach through the night from eating a too-spicey dinner) and was very nervous about meeting the recruiter. (She got an A on the final and in the algebra class, by the way.) The first thing the recruiter had her do was take a practice vocational aptitude test called the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The minimum for getting into the Navy is 35 percent. On four hours’ sleep, an algebra final, and pure adrenaline, she scored 85 percent.

Immediately the recruiters started talking to her about the nuclear engineering program (“nuke”). Younger Daughter had already looked into this program and decided she didn’t want it, partly because of the six-year commitment but mostly because of the working conditions. The pay is astronomical once you leave the service but working conditions are grim (18-hour days, etc.).

The next step was a two-day overnight sojourn at the MEPS (Military Enlistment Processing Station) in Spokane, where she was given physical exams as well as the multi-section ASVAB (covering general science, arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, numerical operations, coding speed, auto and shop information, mathematics knowledge, mechanical comprehension, and electronics).


This time the ASVAB wasn’t a practice test; it was the real deal, and would determine what jobs she would qualify for. Two other young men from Coeur d’Alene who were enlisting scored 60 and 75 percent. Younger Daughter scored – 95 percent. (This is apparently termed a "nerd score.")

Then came the big moment where they called her in to let her know what jobs were available. They had five or six possibilities on the table, none of them great. She called Don twice during this process to get his opinion about two of the positions she was offered. None were what she wanted, so she walked.

At least, she walked for about five minutes. One of the positions she had been offered (called Advanced Electronics Computer Field, AECF) didn’t appeal because it had a six-year commitment (two years of school, four years of active duty), and because of that she hadn’t really investigated it. It’s a position requiring higher ASVAB scores, so she was qualified. The work sounded interesting, and she would have the chance to be on a ship, which she wanted. She went back in to the recruiters and accepted the post, signed the paperwork, and swore the military oath.

(Taking the military oath, along with another recruit)

However evidently she made a bigger impression than she realized. Her ASVAB scores rippled up the chain of command and garnered quite a lot of attention from some muckety-mucks in Washington. At a follow-up meeting with the recruiters, they kept trying to persuade her to be a nuke. A female nuke, apparently, is something the Navy really really really really really likes to see. They even offered to bring in a nuke to talk with her about the position. As I said, it has brutal working conditions but amazing pay (after an enlistee’s service is up and he’s ready to leave the Navy, they offer re-enlistment bonuses of around $100,000 if they’ll stay in the Navy).

(Here's Younger Daughter with the recruiter, looking a bit shell-shocked. Notice the height difference: YD is a hair over five feet, the recruiter something like 6'5")

However the more she investigates the AECF position, the happier she is with it and she has no interest in becoming a nuclear engineer. She leaves after Thanksgiving for boot camp in Great Lakes, Illinois, so we won’t have her for Christmas. After that, she’s in school for two years in Great Lakes, and then her active duty begins. She’ll have vacations, so we’ll get to see her once in a while after boot camp is over.

So why the interest in a military career? As YD put it, "I've never met a vet I haven't liked." She had four college math classes with a cadre of vets and liked them enormously.

In my opinion, the military brings out the best in so many people because it doesn't cultivate anyone's "inner snowflake." It strips away immaturity and victimhood and teaches personal responsibility and self-control. This creates a subculture of Very Good People on the whole.

By the way, a funny thing happened at MEPS. According to Younger Daughter, the recruiting office's goal is to do anything it can to qualify applicants, and the goal of MEPS is to do anything to DISqualify applicants. Since the MEPS she attended is in Spokane, and marijuana is now legal in Washington, the issue of drug use was investigated closely.

At one point a doctor tried to get YD to admit she'd used pot. YD denied it. "You can tell me," the doctor urged. YD denied it. Come on," the doctor persisted. "Are you SURE you've never used marijuana?" YD denied it. He continued to push, until Younger Daughter said, "Look, I was homeschooled on a farm by Christian parents. When would I have had a chance to try marijuana?"

At this the doctor stopped pushing. Instead he smiled, shrugged, and said, "Okay then."

So she’s off to a good start. With her high moral character and frugal upbringing, we have a feeling she’ll do well and go far in the Navy. She may even make a career out it. Even if she doesn’t, the training she gets will insure she has no problem getting a civilian job after her enlistment is over.


We're proud of her decision. It will be tough to have her leave so abruptly, but we're launching a good kid into the world.

83 comments:

  1. Way to go YD! Praying for your continued success in life. Your mom and dad are to be commended for RAISING two well rounded young ladies.

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  2. Congrats to your daughter, sounds like she made a smart well informed decision.

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  3. Congratulations to her - as a former homeschooler, I love to hear about these wonderful successes - and that she figured it out all by herself.

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  5. Wow! Super exciting!!! I am totally surprised... Congrats to daughter and parents...

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  6. CONGRATULATIONS!! ...and best wishes! Hugs all around!

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  7. So proud of YD!! You go girl!!

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  8. So proud of your family values.......go Navy.

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  9. Reading your article actually brought a tear to my eye. My son joined to US Navy 30 years ago, right out of high school and it was and still is the best decision he ever made. I wish YD much success. You and Don have every reason to be proud. May I suggest that you make it a point to attend as many of her promotion cearimonies as you can. You will be busting your buttons with pride.

    Carl In the UP

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  10. What a nail biting moments there.
    YD is an amazing person.
    I have a niece that works at the base and I sent a link to her of your blog. Maybe they will meet.
    God bless her on this new and exciting journey.
    andy

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  11. I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction: 'I served in the United States Navy.” ― John F. Kennedy

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  12. In 1978 I joined the Navy, I to was steered towards being a Nuke but decided against it. I did how ever take a six year hitch as an Electronics Tech. That was about the fastest six years of my life. I only did one hitch as a blue jacket, but I've worked for the Navy since then as a civilian. It was one of the best decisions of my life.

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  13. Congrats YD....You rock....Be prepared for really cold weather in Great Lakes Training....I'm from the Upper Midwest and I have also lived near Lake Mich. shoreline and it is really cold in the winter there...But, the training, I hear, is fantastic...
    Congrats parents for instilling a sense of independence in your daughters...
    Love from NC

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  14. Yet another win for homeschooling.
    Congratulations. From the Daughter of a NavyVet

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  15. Congratulations to YD and her family! Vets are some of my favorite people too. I'm proud of her, and she's not even my family. I want to thank her for her (future) service to me and our country. (I can't help but wonder how no-name commenters will spin this to criticize you and your conservative, homeschooling, Christian parenting. ;) I'm sure they'll find some way to find fault in her life choice.) You and Mr. L. have done a great job raising your girls.

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  16. My eldest daughter married a young man early in his Navy career and had some excellent adventures during his 6 years. My second son went to Great Lakes a few days after he completed high school and is now completing his 10 year security clearance. He married the sweetest gal 5 years ago and his little one is sleeping upstairs right now (happy granny). Your top picture reminds me of a movie type series I saw on youtube back when my son was going to the middle east (and I was a bit panicked). The most moving sight was of the sailors all around the edge of their ship when they were finally coming home. I actually teared up, and that's not generally my "thing", ha. There are moments like that at the presentation at the end of their time at GL. I probably never felt more proud nor more patriotic. There is a group at basic that does more of the ceremony type things (musical, and ushering are the only 2 I can remember). Getting chosen for that was great for my son, and I'll bet it is an option for your daughter :) I think that A school is when the more specific job education begins... I'm rambling. Very happy for your gal, even though I'm certain you are going to miss both daughters tremendously.

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  17. I love her answer that she never met a vet she didn't like. What a lot of wisdom for one so young! I wish I'd had half her smarts at that age!

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  18. congrats and best wishes to YD. my youngest daughter is currently a navy corpsman, lab tech specialty, stationed in iwakuni japan. she just picked up her E-4/PO3 rank, after 2 1/2 years active duty. would have been sooner, but you cannot be promoted while on school status...YD will be an E-3 for a while.
    I spent 6 years in the navy and it was probably the best years of my life...training, travel, and a purpose in lif while I tried to figure out what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.
    bravo Zulu on her choice, and may fair skies and following winds be with her thru her life.

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  19. Wow!!! What a proud moment as parents, for sure!!! So happy for you all!

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  20. Your YD (OD too) are wise beyond their years. They did their homework about careers they would enjoy, not endure.

    My son's BF is in the Navy,and even though he is not my kid, I am quite proud of him. I am one of "those" moms who have "extra" kiddos who I am second mom to. This young man was also home-schooled and thought he was going to go the IT route, but he ended up in PR/photography. He just had the fabulous assignment of filming the ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Oh, he also had "nerd" scores.

    So, as your YD launches out on her own, I will say, good job. The world is a better place because of parents like you.

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  21. Congrats to YD! She's in for a great adventure. Joining the Air Force was the best decision our daughter ever made. She is now going to school on the GI bill and doesn't have to work. She has a 4.0 GPA and is so grateful for her military training. Best wishes and God's blessings to your daughter. We regularly pray for those who serve.

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  22. Thanks for keeping us in the loop with your daughters lives. I do feel that I have to comment on her 95 score. I think that mental achievement is about 60% genes and 40% nurture. Both of your girls have had A++ in both areas. I have never met a dumb homeschooled young person. The fact that they are being homeschooled means that the parents (both of them) care a very great deal about their youngsters. The genes part is self evident based on your and Don's achievements. The nurture part we have been able to see, at least some of it, through these pages. All the best wishes to YD in her new life, her parents have done good!

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  23. I have known this beautiful young woman since she was but a wee lass and I can tell you I'm about to burst with pride. She's an incredible young woman (raised by incredible parents) and she's an asset to our Country, to our Navy, and to every life she touches. Go YD .... my family is so proud of you! (((Hugs)))

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  24. Good luck younger daughter, from a retired Aviation Electronics Technician

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  25. Congratulations to YD, and good luck in your career choice! I know you and Don are extremely proud of both of your girls, as you well should be!

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  26. Congratulations and good luck YD. God bless you during your service to our country.

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  27. Outstanding news! Congrats to her!

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  28. Parent of an air force vet here...congrats! I am a big fan of basic training as a mandatory thing for all high school grads - we were impressed with all the young people we met at graduation from basic. Don't send musical cards while she's in basic training! ;)

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  29. Thank you for your service to our country, all of you are to be commended, this is a huge sacrifice, and from a proud wife of a navy vet I am eternally grateful.

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  30. Congratulations!! You have a very wise daughter. While the beginning of her path is new and exciting, many opportunities will present themselves. Some will require lots of work on her part, and they are worth it!! An opportunity for her to become a commissioned officer will be there but she will have to do some schooling (Navy pays!) before applying... Just something to think about.. I didn't know what I wanted to do either. Spent four years active duty and another 33 as a civilian working for Navy/DoD... Just retired after a very fulfilling career...

    Good Luck

    May Fair Winds and Following Seas always be with her...

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  31. Please thank YD for her service. She has been well prepared for success. But are you and Don ready for an empty nest?

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  32. As a current Navy Chief with 19 years of service, welcome aboard, YD. Our military needs people like you with a strong character who aren't afraid to work. Understand that there are a lot of "snowflake" hoops to jump through these days, but when it all shakes out, it's a good thing. Be patient, keep your end goal in sight and you'll go far. Welcome aboard!

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  33. Congratulations to your daughter. I spent 8 years in the USN as a Hospital Corpsman and it was the best 8 years of my life. I grew into an adult and learned so much along the way. Got to live in really great places and the experience has carried me into my present job. I am so happy for her. Be strong mom and dad for her. This is a great decision. Beth Masontown PA.

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  34. She made the better choice not being a nuke. Husband was one for 11yrs on subs. Be careful when getting out. They'll do ANYTHING to scare you and keep you in. Our complaints about the navy are that they own you and religion isn't popular. Family is not second but third or fourth in importance. They do pay well and that's a plus. May God bless her and protect her on this journey. I haven't actually seen than the military makes for better people actually. Over a 75% divorce rate and rampant addictions to cope with the stress. The good people are typically ostracized and shunned for not following suit with drinking partying etc. Very worldly. The women in the military I know personally have had very traumatic experiences when having a family. She is so smart I pray that her non nuke navy is far better than what the nuke program offers.

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    1. I was wondering what the ages of the vets were that YD was talking about. My feeling is that they were probably older rather than younger as a rule. May God protect her!

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    2. Mid- to late-20's, attending college on the GI Bill. She said there was one with a bad personal life, but the rest were dedicated family men. Foul mouths but big hearts.

      - Patrice

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  35. AWESOME, AWESOME, AWESOME!!! I'm so excited for her I'm in tears! She will get top notch training, and will be a real asset to the Navy!

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  36. Thank you for raising someone who wants to do their best for God and Country. Rudyard Kipling said "People sleep soundly in their beds at night because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." And while I'm sure YD has some willing Rough in her if needed, in many cases the quote could be paraphrased "Peaceful and good people sleep soundly in their beds at night because smart and dedicated men and women stand ready to do their duty on their behalf."

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    1. Actually the quote is from George Orwell, but is indeed a good one, and fits the occasion well!

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  37. Amazing! Well done, Don, Patrice and YD! God bless her!

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  38. Good for her, I'm sure she'll really enjoy her time in the service. My wife and I travel to Great Lakes often to use the Lovell VA hospital there. If she'd like a visit from another "OLD" vet let me know and we'll look her up. Also there is a process that allows service personal a long way from home to have Thanksgiving dinner with a civilian family and we'd be honored for her to join us if she'd like. If either of these suggestions are acceptable with her she can contact me at oldnamvet0@gmail.com Use the title of "rural revolution response" so it doesn't get thrown automatically into the spam file.

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  39. YD, God Bless, Guide and Protect you.
    Remember: HARD TIMES DON'T LAST,
    STRONG PEOPLE DO.
    Retired Navy Chief

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  40. Congrats to her from a Proud Navy vet.
    She should get a Christmas leave from basic, at least we did.
    Go Navy

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  41. My son is a Navy sonar tech. He is at sea right now, can't say where. His was a six year hitch, and it was worth it for him, even with a wife and daughter. The training and the stability was what attracted him, along with the chance to serve his country. She will do well, I am certain. Thank her for me. My son is a 2nd class petty officer, with less than half of his hitch to go.

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  42. Thank YD for me in advance for sacrificing and serving our country.

    Maybe someone else can answer this....what happens if you get sea sick? While I can fish small lakes, I cannot fish on the Great Lakes without a patch (no other methods work).

    Good job parents!

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  43. She will make plenty of money from the skills acquired from the ACEF program, along with leadership courses, and learning the job ahead of you. Military vets get preference in hiring in many civilian careers. The Navy offers camaraderie along with travel so keep control of your decisions and protect your personal reputation while in the military. Treat your leave like a bank account on a budget, for it must make due for a whole year.

    . . .and "Fair Winds and Following Seas". . .

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  44. My hubby served for 29 years in the Navy. He loved his experiences and talks fondly of the many places he traveled. Always enjoy your shore leave in groups of like minded people, for safety sake. Congrats YD!

    A.jones
    Florida

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  45. So proud for you and YD! She's got to be tough and if she is she''l thrive. Our Navy needs great young people! Thanks and good luck YD!

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  46. Congratulations to you (on a job well done) and to her (on a responsible decision). She has my gratitude for the choice to serve and my prayers for her success and safety.

    Congratulations seem like the appropriate thing to offer, but... I feel like crying for you.

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  47. Congrats and Godspeed! Our son chose the Army and it has been such a great experience. I know your YD will thrive and serve her country with distinction!

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  48. Outstanding and I am very happy for the pride you must carry in your heart for both of your talented girls...
    Congrats and thank you for your future service to our great nation YD.

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  49. Wow! Give yourselves a big pat on the back for raising 2 such amazing daughters! How wonderful that your YD joined the Navy to learn and travel, versus deciding to backpack and "work" along the way. She must be a very smart cookie!
    -Sandra T

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  50. Congratulations from one Navy family to another. Both my husband Navy Commander(ret), myself-Navy Chief Petty Officer and our son-Navy Aircrewman and now a Navy Ensign and future naval aviator, and our daughter-who served four years as a Navy Hosptial Corpsman..As we say in the Navy "Fair Winds and Following Seas!" There is a website called "Navy for Moms" that I highly recommend that you join. There will be other moms there--many who will have sons and daughters in the same graduating class as your daughter. This website is an invaluable tool for families to learn about the Navy customs and protocol, as well as, making new friends and finding support with others who are "In the same boat" as you. Again congratulations to your daughter. As a Navy vet, my heart swells with pride in her decision to be a apart of America's finest, and serve in the United States Navy.

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  51. Here is an article containing relevant information that was probably not disclosed during YD's recruitment process: https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/06/laurence-m-vance/daughter-joined-military/

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    1. Patrice, if you haven't already, please don't go and read this article. It is hyperbolic and addresses things that your daughter can face with the Holy Spirit in her heart and God at her side. I'm also sure she is aware of the problems that are sometimes rampant in the military, anyway.

      In the world, but not of it...

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    2. P.S. Again, posting things that are critical of someone's else's decision(s) under "Anonymous" is cowardly.

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    3. Some people are smart, others post their names, you can be found!

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    4. Ms. W, so protecting one’s privacy is now 'cowardly'? That's ridiculous in TODAY'S world.

      Secondly, I don't think Patrice needs to find a safe space so that she is protected from reading this article. The author is obviously well versed in Christianity and TODAY'S US military.

      Lastly, Mr. Vance presented 10 reasons why "A Christian young woman has no business being in the military". I believe he rationally supported all 10 reasons by facts. You dismissed them as "hyperbolic". Really? I’m sorry but emotions don’t trump facts. Ms. W, please explain which of the 10 reasons are not based on facts.

      Montana Guy

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    5. I guess if you go around using "anonymous" all the time when you comment on other people sites b/c you don't want to be found and don't want to stand behind your opinions with your name, then so be it. I'm sure if you have convictions on things that aren't popular, you can be "found" by people in your daily life/community, anyway. You don't really need to worry about the internet in that case. Your choice, but I don't have to admire or like it.

      I wasn't suggesting that Patrice needs a safe space. She's a big girl, and I was just hoping to spare her some head space and time reading something I didn't think was worth it.

      I called them hyperbolic b/c of purely unemotional reasons. Actually, now that I think of it, hyperbole is not really the right way to describe it, b/c the author was making exaggerated statements but was also meaning them to be taken literally.

      Here is an example:
      " 3. Sex. Women in the military are greatly outnumbered by men. Many of the men don’t mind women in the military for one reason: sex. No wonder the Navy has a serious problem with pregnancies on its ships. Christians are to avoid fornication. The military is no place to be for a Christian young woman who wants to keep herself pure for her future husband."

      This is an exaggerated threat. The author is assuming that a Christian woman who enters the military will be unable to avoid fornication. You want to talk about ridiculous, that is one ridiculous thing right there. This statement was also not supported by any "facts", such as how many Christians who join the military end up fornicating.

      I don't have time to go through each of the points, many of which are unsubstantiated by any "facts". However, one other point: He makes it sound like b/c there are bad things in the military, like transgender and homosexuality, for example, then Christians should stay out. Guess what, these types of problems are also all over the place, like at the McDonald's down the street. Christians can't run screaming every time they encounter the problems of a sinful world.

      In the world and not of it...

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    6. Ms. W, I'm sorry but to imply that the moral depravity encountered at McDonalds is comparable to that encountered in the US military is also ridiculous. No one at McDonalds has the authority to force a poisoned hamburger down your throat. Much worse atrocities are commonly committed in the US military through physical force, overwhelming peer pressure, survival by conformity, majority rule, and worse of all commanding authority. Have you ever been in the military? Soldiers don’t call 911.

      A better comparison would be Sodom. Can you name one act of depravity commonly practiced at Sodom that is not commonly practiced in the US military? Lot too had God at his side. Imagine if Lot had taken your advice and stood his ground against overwhelming depravities.

      We are not God. Let Him deal with bastions of evil.

      Montana Guy

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    7. I am not implying that the depravity encountered at McDonald's is comparable to that in the military. I am saying that evil is everywhere.

      Nope. Never been in the military. Have you? But yes, I have known many fine people in the military, and there are plenty commenting here that are not being discouraging.

      With God nothing is impossible.

      I am not giving any advice, either. I'm not saying one way or the other what I think YD should do. And I certainly wouldn't have told Lot to stay in Sodom, for Pete's sake. God told him to get out! I would not contradict that! God would not have "been at his side" if he defiantly stayed in Sodom. God is also not telling anyone not to go into the US military.

      Obviously you have a very dark view of the military, and I'm sorry for whatever brought that about, but I obviously don't think that a Christian can't survive it like it seems you do.

      Obviously, it's YD and her parents' business and I'm done with my responses to you in this area.

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  52. Congratulations! That's a fantastic route for her to take and will give her valuable time to think about a career while she's being paid to defend her country and develop excellent skills for the workplace.

    Air Force and Army vet here, would have loved to have tried the Navy also.

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  53. Congratulations and good luck to YD. I have been reading your page for quite a few years and feel like I have watched both of your daughters grow up into fine young ladies. I love your page and the way you post pictures of your processes. Fine job by a whole family of great people!

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  54. I enjoy reading your articles. Congrats to YD on her high scores! She sounds like a smart girl with all the research and study she's done.
    I do have a question, though: Should Christian women (or any women) be in the military? Again, this is just a question. Most conservative Christians speak/ write against women in the military on strategic and moral grounds.

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    1. But it is okay for Christian men to join the military? They will be working with women who are not Christian. Then these young men get a jaded view of women. She is a smart girl with her head screwed on right. She will be fine. The Navy is not like the Marines. She will not be learning hand to hand combat (unless she wants to). She will have a tech job. She may be able to spread her Christian values around. Lots of people could use it.

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  55. I hope you will be able to find someone to take care of your little farm for a short period of time, while you and Don attend her graduation. It's an amazing experience.

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  56. And here is a very good blog about and for the Navy,
    https://blog.usni.org
    Mostly big picture stuff and excellent writing.

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  57. I had 95s across all Three ASVAB test, yes there are Three test not one. At least it was that way in 1982, spent 10yrs in Crypt o, same promises of big re-up bonuses. All I'm saying is keep your eyes open, they will talk to you like a used car salesman just to get you to sign on the dotted line. Love you guys, be careful.

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  58. Girl....Once you have to horns in your hand its hard to give up control. Get it done

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  59. Parenting is the one job that the better you are at it, the sooner you are guaranteed to be out of work. You have done a fine job of raising adults. Those that raise children are never out of work.

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  60. When my Mom left the farm for the first time, Great Lakes is where she went.
    - Charlie

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  61. I pray all the best for YD and your entire family. Thank you for being a blessing to so many.

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  62. As a vet myself, I know you are indeed proud of YD. I do wonder why she kept it to herself for so long. Was she afraid you both would talk her out of it? Even with the prospect of the training w a field she can appreciate, you have to remember that the Service needs come first. She is blessed with the high scores in her tests and this will go a long way to insuring they treat her right.

    I do have some fears as previously expressed about the "current" non- religious climate and intolerance of Christian values. The Navy is still a man's land even today... There WILL be pressures against chaste and wholesome behavior. She has the right attitude and with companionship with like minded recruits she will do much better.

    Luckily today, we have some of the best to choose from for service to our country. YD is proof!

    I wish her well and fair winds and following seas as well!

    By the way, Great Lakes is about 85 miles from my hometown (where I grew up). The weather should not be THAT much different from Idaho with the following caveat: The winds from Lake Mich. can be bitter in winter. Luckily, they seldom come from the East.

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  63. As a Navy Nuke Submariner Vet from the 70's, I am proud of your daughter. There will be pressures to do things that will go against her upbringing, but if she keeps God at her side she will be fine.

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  64. Congratulations from a new USCG mom! I'm sure your head is spinning. I know mine was! My son was going to go to college for criminal justice & firefighting. Could decide which so was going to just do both. His heart is search & rescue. He decided a month before college to join the Coast Guard. He flew to Chicago as that was the nearest recruiter. Signed and loved boot camp. Not sure why, but he loves a challenge. Reporting to 1st duty was stressful and overwhelming. But he is loveing it and learning lots. He will leave his ship for school this fall/early winter. We miss him but are proud of his work ethic and wanting to save/help others. Semper Paratus!

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  65. Congratulations from an Army mom! I'm so proud of all the young men and women who make the choice to serve. Hope she enjoys the job.

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  66. Congratulations to you all! As a Marine Mom I know the gamut of emotions you must be facing. It will be quite a journey for you all! And great ASVAB scores-way to go, that's a feather in your homeschooling caps. My son's scores were not quite that impressive but he did break the record for his recruiting station on his DLab, which made his homeschooling lit major mama happy. She will do well-Godspeed and anchors aweigh to her, and thanks for her service.

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  67. Am I the only one who cringes at the mention of women in the military? I gather she would not be in combat, but surely she could be in harms way if we are involved in war. I just think that men should step up and serve, and women don't need to be put in a situation that they would have to physically defend our country. It's just the way I feel.

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    1. I am a 62 year old female that is PROUD of my service to my country. US Navy 1975 - 1979. Give the chance I would do it over again, it was the best decision I made in my life !!

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    2. How dare you diminish the women who have served http://www.warhistoryonline.com/world-war-ii/charity-edna_adams-m.html

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  68. I strongly advise you to tell YD to be extremely careful in Chicago and Waukegan. Only go out in groups and be aware of her surroundings at ALL times. The violence is getting worse every week. I wish her the best in her career choice. I was one of the few females back in the day :-) (ET3 1975-1979)

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