Country Living Series

Sunday, December 6, 2020

Update: Bits and bobs

Wow, have I really not posted anything on the blog since Thanksgiving? My apologies, dear readers. The days are simply flying by. I've been dealing with multiple writing deadlines and other work-related issues, as well as our continuing efforts to relocate.

Update on our new home: We close on or around December 16. We drove over to see the place last week -- second time for Don, first time for me -- and would you believe I didn't even take my camera out of my pocket to take any photos?

The property is everything we'd hoped for in a new place. That is, the bones are there. We have our work cut out for us to make it into the self-sufficient homestead we want. But that's okay -- we wanted a place we could make our own, and this is it. Apparently we'll be blessed by lovely neighbors too (according to the sellers), which is so important.

The biggest and best features of the property are the house and barn. The house is in beautiful condition, with a back porch/deck sporting spectacular views. The barn is a big open space we can personalize to accommodate a wood shop, a chicken coop, cattle feed boxes, stalls, a milking parlor, hay storage, and even a root "cellar." Isn't it typical that I get more excited by a barn than by a house?

The sellers are a very nice family relocating to Texas for work-related reasons. We extended to them the same courtesy the buyers of our last home gave to us, namely if they needed more time to move out, that's fine. Like us, they're moving both a household and a farm. They're even moving livestock! AND it's the middle of winter to boot. We fully understand the logistics of moving all these components.

But apparently they need to get to Texas sooner rather than later, and seem to think it won't be a problem for them to vacate the property by closing. Which means -- drum roll -- within two weeks we could be moving in. We're making arrangements with some friends (notably, strong young friends) to helps us load a U-Haul with our household goods from this rental home, after which we'll vacate and relocate. Can't wait!

Meanwhile, a while ago a reader posted a comment as follows: "Just curious...did you take your wood cookstove with you or sell it with the house? I have been dreaming about getting one ever since you posted about yours and I couldn't imagine leaving it behind although I know it would be difficult to move."

Excellent question. Short answer: We left the cookstove with the house. At about 400 pounds, it's not an easy thing to move. Plus, well, it's the primary heat source for the house and we could hardly deprive the buyers of it in the middle of winter.

This doesn't mean it was an easy decision to leave that stove behind. We knew we wanted to get an identical model for our next place.

Then, on October 1, I had an interesting email exchange with Glenda Lehman Ervin, Director of Marketing at Lehman's in Ohio, as follows: "If you want the Baker’s Choice or Pioneer Princess, I would order soon.  Last I heard we had 18 on back order (they are Amish made and the vendor can’t keep up)."

Don and I talked it over, and then we immediately placed an order for a brand-new Baker's Choice cookstove (not through Lehman's, but through Obadiah's, the same Montana distributor we used before, figuring shipping would be cheaper). When we placed the order, we explained we were moving and would not be in a position to take possession of the stove until such time as we had a new place. They gave the same warning as Lehman's did; namely, the stoves are on back order and it might take up to several months for one to become available. We said that would be perfect timing, since we wouldn't need one for that amount of time. We also paid for the stove in full.

So imagine my surprise when we were contacted only nine days later that our stove was available. Ack! We didn't even have a property we wanted to buy at that time! What would we do with a 400-pound cookstove?

Our buyers have been so kind. They agreed we could store the stove in the barn until such time as we could move to a new place.

So here it is, our brand-new Baker's Choice cookstove.


I'm beyond thrilled to have it! We've looked over the floor plan of our new home and have already decided where it will go.

Since we could be moving into our new place within two weeks, we'll be able to start transporting all the farm equipment -- and the cookstove -- over the winter as weather permits. So far it's been cold but clear, but of course that may not last, and we don't want to risk driving trucks filled with household goods or farm equipment through a snowstorm. We're so grateful to our buyers for their generosity in letting us take our time moving out.

Woot! A new cookstove awaits!

12 comments:

  1. Is there a "break in" period for wood stoves?

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    1. Sort of. The first time it's fired up, we were warned -- and it was true -- that there would be strong fumes from the paint vapor burning off. It doesn't last long, maybe a couple of hours, but it's strong (we had to open all the windows). After that, it's fine.

      - Patrice

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  2. you treat your buyers right and they will return the favor. Sounds like the folks you just bought from are the same. Out in the hunter boonies you tend to take care of eachother.

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  3. Seasons greetings. Can you tell us approximately where your new home is located?

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    1. We're in Idaho. That's about as approximate as I'll get (smile).

      - Patrice

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  4. What fortuitous circumstances Patrice! Huzzah! Although my goodness, what a whirlwind.

    Excited to see pictures!

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  5. Lots of exciting things going on for y'all. Thanks for updating us and letting us share in the excitement!

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  6. I'm glad things are shaping up for you. It's good that you have YOUNG STRONG friends! - lol

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  7. can you burn it off outside before you move it in?

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    1. Yes. Just set the stove up outdoors and build a fire in the firebox. I'd recommend letting it burn for a good couple of hours. Then, after it cools, the stove can be set up in the house. There might still be a bit of residual smell in the house, but not nearly as bad, and it will soon fade.

      - Patrice

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  8. It's so encouraging to hear how the Lord is providing for you step by step and day by day. He is so good!

    Can't wait to see the new place and how you pull it together to work for you. I'm sure I'll get lots of good ideas! :-)

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  9. QUOTE: "The sellers are a very nice family relocating to Texas for work-related reasons."

    NO. they just wised up enough relize that all the people moving out of comifornia are comming to Idaho and are leaving before they get stuck with the check!

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