Country Living Series

Monday, July 2, 2018

Apple "support"

I received an email from "Apple support" the other day informing me my "payment has been paid successfully." (Please note I do not own a single Apple product. Not one.)


The text of the email said, and I quote precisely:
Dear Client,

Your Purchase has been successfully

To check detail your purchase, check invoice in attachment file (pdf)

if you unauthorized this transactions, please cancel the order.

Detail Transaction:

- Item: 6000 Diamonds Mobile Legends Bang-Bang
- Price: $99.00
- Saturday, July 1 2018

It occurs to me if these scam artists are trying to pass themselves off as American corporations, they might have better success in their scams if they hired native English speakers to write their copy. Besides, July 1 is a Sunday, not a Saturday. And what in blazes is a "Bang Bang"? Is that an actual Apple product?

Anyway, it gave me a good chuckle before I hit the "delete" button (without "check detail my purchase" by opening the virus-laden pdf).

13 comments:

  1. I will have to admit that I fell for a Microsoft scam about 2 years ago. I called it my stupid tax! They have called me a number of times since but I just lay down the phone till they go away.

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  2. (Please note I do not own a single Apple product. Not one.)

    How is the orchard doing this year?:)

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  3. Here is another twist on "scam city news"....

    BEWARE....if you are selling anything in the paper or on Ebay. We were selling some puppies and here's how it went:

    "Pollo" wanted to buy one IMMEDIATELY for his "little boy"(broken English all through the text message he left.)

    The pups were $800...but he wanted to send us a cashiers check for $2500 to cover the cost to buy and send the pup to Texas. We were to send back TO HIM the leftover money we didn't use to accomplish this while keeping an extra hundred dollars for our efforts. (At this point I was just curious to see how this scam would unfold.)

    Sure enough...here comes the money order (through FedEx no less). It looked real. I cautiously took it to the bank and they knew about the scam right away...(figured they would).

    It is the sending of the unused money back (with detailed instructions no less) that would be the GOTCHA moment for some poor sucker...and you would also be responsible for the fraudulent money order.

    WOW!..I received several other offers during the lifespan of this add...different names...different places.

    Evidently, they will do this with anything you are trying to sell.....so keep an open eye. J.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I got one yesterday that was a pop up window with a super loud shrill, it advised me that I had gotten some malware virus and to click the button for repair. I deleted all and used my usual virus site to do the job, of course I had nothing, I do have an Apple computer and their window looked very convincing, but not enough for me to click. They are really working overtime.

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  5. I occasionally view the items in my spam box. A few are surprisingly well crafted; most are just lame. Yes, native English writers would be a help.

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  6. I never open any e-mail if I don't recognize the sender. Got caught once with a nasty virus, lesson learned.

    Current scam: We order a lot from Amazon, mainly food staples and items for repairing stuff, and recently have been getting e-mails from "AmaZ*on", their spelling, regarding our purchase. Just who do they think they're dealing with?

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  7. The bad english is not a bug it's a feature. It filter out people who are not gullible enough

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  8. LOL, that's pretty good. I agree that the use of English is one of the best giveaways. I guess they're just hoping someone will click on a link or reply(?)

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  9. I keep getting emails telling me that an article I bought was paid for by my PayPal account. The problem is I don't have a PayPal account. I also just delete the messages.

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  10. It was probably written by a millennial in the US.

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) reports: Out of 22 participating countries, only millennials in Spain and Italy had lower scores.

    Government know what it is doing. Millennials think they will be in the labor force when in fact they will be in forced labor.

    Dock Guy

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  11. The Internet. So much fun, so much information, so many opportunities to lose your shirt. Still, I admire the scammers persistence as they work so hard, not to work at all.

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  12. There is a growing group who take it upon themselves to video the phone call to the scammers and waste their time and then put them on you tube, they truly are quite entertaining to watch, most of these people messing with the scammers are retired and clearly have plenty of time to waste the scammers time.

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  13. Happy Independence Day to all! It helped make this blog possible. Very thankful indeed.

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