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Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Homemade fence-puller

The following photos illustrate a homemade fence-puller Don made last spring to stretch fencing single-handedly (I wasn't able to assist) with the aid of a fence puller/splicer. These photos accompany an article I'm submitting to Backwoods Home Magazine and are numbered so the editor can choose which photos she wants to use.

Photo 1: Two 2x4s, with screws half-way inserted into one of the boards.

Photo 2

Photo 3: The boards are hinged at one end

Photo 4

Photo 5: The other end of the boards are secured by a 4 1/2 inch lag bolt and wingnut.

Photo 6

Photo 7: At the top and bottom, a lag bolt secures a six-foot chain.

Photo 8

Photo 9: The screws down the length of the board serve to hold the fence wire in place so it won't pull out during the stretching process.

Photo 10: To begin, the fence is loosely stretched in place.

Photo 11: To keep the fencing upright temporarily, tack it loosely with a nail (or wire, if using T-posts).

Photo 12: To use the fence-puller, remove the bolt/wingnut at the bottom and lift it over the portion of fence you want to tighten.

Photo 13

Photo 14: Secure the bottom by inserting the lag bolt and wingnut.

Photo 15: Using the fence puller/splicer, start ratcheting the fence taut.

Photo 16

Photo 17

Photo 18: Once the fence is stretched taut, it can be secured with U-nails (for wooden posts) or wire (for T-posts).

Photo 19: When stretching between T-posts, secure the fence puller/splicer to the next T-post for stretching the fencing.

Photo 20

13 comments:

  1. That's a neat idea. Certainly works better than my standard t-post threaded through the wire method :)

    I find an 8N tractor makes a better actual puller than the jack type thing though :)

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  2. Patrice,
    That is not a 'lag screw', it's a bolt.
    And what you call a 'U-nail' is a fence staple.

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    Replies
    1. I'm so tired of pathetic perfectville people!

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    2. Please excuse me; I mistook you for a writer who might want to learn the correct nomenclature.

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    3. Note: I didn't make the above reply. However I didn't use the term "lag screw" anywhere in the post I can see.

      - Patrice

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    4. "U" nail is so cute! Better than "thingy"
      Photo 14 caption does say "lag bolt".

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    5. yah its say LAG BOLT, not LAG SCREW
      WHAT A BUNCH OF KIDS. THE PIC TELLS THE STORY.
      GROW UP
      Thanks Mate great info and Yes I will be using it in the very near future
      KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK.
      Forget the KIDS-

      Delete
  3. Yep. We built one of those last year ourselves. We used bolts and nuts all the way down, instead of screws. I do like the use of the hinge at the end. A farmers gotta do what a farmers gotta do.

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  4. If Don could perfect the equivalent to a Vulcan mind meld for homesteaders he'd be the Spock of country living, and I be among those lining up for my husband to get one.

    He sure does a lot of amazing things for bein' a redundant feller, don't he? :~)

    Yay Don!

    A. McSp

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  5. We just moved to the country and the existing corral will not do for future goats, I told my husband he would first have to put up fencing and this fence puller idea is great for such a job You once stated that living out in the country was never ending fencing to fix or put up. You are so right.

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  6. Pretty much the same thing I did for my fence, but used a rachet and strap for tightening. Good job!

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  7. Quick and functional. Got the job done no matter what you call the individual parts.

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