Sunday, September 5, 2021

For ladies only

If the last 18 months has done nothing else, it has illustrated how reusable/washable items are vastly preferred to disposables, especially during times of shortages. You never run out and there's never a "run" at the grocery store.

For example, young parents who use cloth diapers for their babies were in a much better position during the pandemic than those using disposables. They never ran out, nor did they have to trample others and strip store shelves bare in a desperate bid to stock up.

The same applies to feminine hygiene.

This summer, I did something I haven't had to do for a long time: I ordered some new washable panty liners from Naturally Cozy. My old ones were getting ragged.

I've reached the happy age where I no longer need monthly sanitary products, but I am freakin' addicted to these cloth panty liners. I use them daily. I think the last time I ordered a batch was eight or nine years ago. That's how long they last.

When the new liners came in, I was pleased to see the quality had, if anything, improved since the last time I ordered.

The literature accompanying the products indicate the edges are not serged but instead finished with a zigzag stitch: "This stitch allows some fraying around the edges of your pads. The serger stitch tends to cause chafing and our patrons prefer the softer feel of fraying. If you have long strings after your first wash, simply clip them off. The fraying should then just cause a soft comfy feel – 'Broken in' – like your favorite pair of jeans. Ultimately, the double or triple zigzag stich that we use will make your pads last much longer than if they had been serged."

After one washing, sure enough:

 Yet they are, if possible, even more comfortable after washing.

Even though washable items cost more at the outset, they amortize very well over time. This month, Proctor & Gamble raised prices on many items, including feminine hygiene. But once you own washable versions of monthly necessities, price increases are a thing of the past.

Shortages are expected to continue. According to this article, "Experts are warning that items like toilet paper, tampons, diapers, plastic bags, chlorine, steel, furniture, computer chips, and cleaning products will also be in short supply soon."

I dunno about you, but washable monthly necessities sound like an awfully good idea looking ahead.

6 comments:

  1. I can tell you that we're waiting 6 weeks or more for a new mattress, and the furniture store owner said that's a much better time that what they are getting for furniture...guess I'd look at "antiques" or "recycled" furniture which would probably last longer too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Portable toilet bidets were very handy for my household during COVID toilet paper shortages (and for years before). I buy the cheap bundles of washcloths from Walmart and a small lidded bathroom trash can to hold the discarded "wipes". However, before anyone goes "E-wwwww", let me just say, these cloths are not to wipe with, but to DRY your CLEAN bum with. The bidet makes everyone feel cleaner, especially women, and just was the drying wipes in the washer with underwear, etc. Saves lots of money on paper products as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used only washcloths for years instead of tp. Yes, I did wipe with them, but I had washed baby diapers for three babies. I did keep a roll of tp in case I had a big issue to clean from myself. Otherwise, the washcloths worked for liquid and solids.

      Delete
  3. I just ordered a couple to try. Definitely something important to be stocked up on "in case".

    ReplyDelete
  4. I too did not worry about the toilet paper shortage last year. I've been using cloth toilet wipes for years now. I developed an bediallergic reaction to the chemicals that are used to make toilet paper and had to switch to cloth. They're only used for urine, now considering getting a bidet attachment.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I too am past the monthly thing, but lately especially find need for stuff like this. Although not incontinent, since co-vid, if going shopping for a day or driving somewhere of distance, I now wear disposables. Just saying, public restrooms have never been my thing, but now ? Nah! Plus you never know when you'll be trapped in your vehicle due to some accident or other things and really need to "make water" where there's no privacy. So there's some need for disposables.

    I did check out that site for a different reason though. Looking for overnight pads for an old cat who's almost 22 years old and soaks herself multiple times a day while she sleeps. It's costing me $1-2 per day in piddle pads. It's funny you posted this when you did because I had decided yesterday to find some cloth diapers to use as under pads or make some myself. She's not giving up the ghost anytime soon, eats well,and when she's awake normally handles her business appropriately. But she's sleeping a lot. I can't throw her out at this stage of life. Anyway, washable under pads are very expensive too. I think I'll make some mini-tarps out of chicken feed sacks with little grommets to lace home made pads to, or store bought diapers if they're squarish. Then launder and dry them outside. Just wish I'd thought of this sooner. I've spent a ton of $ on piddle pads for old animals through the years. My large lab died last year and she wet the floor underneath herself all through the last year of her life every night. Cardboard and the burn pile solved that. She was enjoying life and was a good companion during that time. But the disposables market is pretty much cornered for our old, almost human like family members.$$$

    ReplyDelete