Country Living Series

Sunday, November 11, 2018

A hundred years ago today

A hundred years ago today, World War I ended.


This, of course, is the origin of Veteran's Day, originally called Armistice Day.

I remember reading about how the horrors of World War I were eclipsed by the horrors of World War II, and the sacrifices and suffering of the men who fought in the first great war were forgotten because of how much sacrifice and suffering came out of the second great war.

This may be true. Every war has its share of sacrifices and suffering. War is a horrible, horrible thing. It's only because of the bravery of those willing to fight and push back against evil that the world has not been overcome.

Since today is Veteran's Day, please remember to thank a vet for your freedom.


Don't forget the brave men and women who have served our country.


Don't forget the ones who won't be coming back.


It is the Soldier, not the minister
Who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the Soldier, not the reporter
Who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the Soldier, not the poet
Who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the Soldier, not the campus organizer
Who has given us freedom to protest.

It is the Soldier, not the lawyer
Who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the Soldier, not the politician
Who has given us the right to vote.

It is the Soldier who salutes the flag,
Who serves beneath the flag,
And whose coffin is draped by the flag,
Who allows the protester to burn the flag.
For an amazing photo tour of Ardennes American Cemetery in Liege, Belgium, where Don's uncle is buried, see this post.


Thank you to our veterans.

6 comments:

  1. It says something sad about our society that the old man is standing while others are seated.

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  2. Post Alley CrackpotNovember 11, 2018 at 3:27 PM

    Oh Patrice, what are we going to do with you? :-)

    This is a photo of a Russian military veteran dressed up with his medals so he can ride the Moscow subway for free!

    "не прислоняться" (ne prislonyat'sya) means "do not lean (against the doors)", and that's a Moscow subway map behind him.

    It's OK though, we do this every year. :-)

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  3. Check this out - Haunting and yet beautiful - The moment the guns fell silent: Eerie WW1 recording captures exact second the chaos of war stopped dead... to be replaced by beautiful birdsong https://videos.dailymail.co.uk/video/mol/2018/11/08/9061260928198200974/1024x576_MP4_9061260928198200974.mp4

    God Bless,
    Janet in MA

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  4. If United States Marine Corps major general Smedley Butler was here today, his Veteran’s Day message would be, BRING ALL OF THE TROOPS HOME IMMEDIATELY! In his words, “I believe in adequate defense at the coastline and nothing else.”

    Who was Smedley Butler? He was major general, the highest rank authorized at that time, and at the time of his death the most decorated Marine in U.S. history. He is author of ‘War is a Racket’.

    Montana Guy

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  5. I am grateful for the appreciative comments every year, from strangers and family alike. Perhaps it's my somber nature, but every Veteran's Day reminds me of a little poem...

    In times times of danger, not before,
    Both God and soldier men adore.
    When danger's gone and things are righted,
    God's forgotten and the soldier slighted.

    Got any homeless vets in your community?

    Please give of your time or money to getting them back on their feet.


    Steve Davis
    Anchorage, Alaska
    20 yrs USAF veteran

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  6. Odd. They did not 'serve our country'. Occupying foreign lands is not in service to our country. Those that stayed here, home - did. But the rest did not. They served the Empire. Pretending that those who serve the Empire and kill other people is a 'service to our contry' is a massive lie.

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