Country Living Series

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Canning mustard

We usually buy items in bulk at Cash 'n Carry or Costco. That includes things like mustard and mayonnaise.

A couple months ago I had bought a couple of large jugs of mustard at Costco and opened one of them, which of course is now in the fridge. My husband, not realizing I'd already opened a jug, opened the second...which must now be refrigerated as well. With the milk I'm getting from our cow, fridge space is at a premium and I had these two big jugs taking up room.



So I decided to try canning mustard. What the heck, it never hurts to try, right?

I poured all the mustard into a pot and heated it up.



I spooned it into squat pint jars...



I put them in two layers in a boil-bath canner for 20 minutes.



As far as I can see, they turned out fine.



I labeled and dated them and stored them away (I left one pint uncanned in the fridge for immediate use). When it comes time to opened one of the canned jars of mustard, and assuming it tastes okay, I'll buy up several gallons of mustard and re-can them. I like having condiments canned up in small jars.

21 comments:

  1. Fabulous idea. I am wondering if the experts from the USDA have ever tested canned mustard? I am wondering if it needs hot water canning or pressure canning????
    How about adding ingredients like horseradish or wasabe? Please let us know if someone gives you more information because I would like to do this. I live alone but like to have extra on hand and like to buy in large quantity to save moolah.

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  2. I figured that since mustard has vinegar in it, it would be high enough in acidity to boil-bath it. I found one reference online to homemade mustard and how to can it, and it said to boil-bath for 20 minutes, so that's what I did. Seems to have worked!

    - Patrice

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  3. This is great. I love the savings and the reduced trash from buying in bulk, but I also hate to give up the frige space. I bet this would work for ketchup too.

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  4. Oh yes, I've canned ketchup. Works beautifully.

    - Patrice

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  5. Patrice...
    Does processing in two layers affect the process time at all? Abby at Frugalfraulein knows I was just asking her about the type of rack to use between layers of jars, but your post made me wonder if the processing time would change if it was one layer versus two.

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  6. Nope, the processing time is exactly the same. My particular canner holds either seven quarts (in one rack) or 18 pints (in two racks). No difference at all in processing time.

    - Patrice

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  7. I bet you could add a little honey and do up some honey mustard.
    Those are standard size jugs at our house as my husband loves mustard on everything.

    Tina

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  8. This is brilliant! I am so doing this! And I love your pics of your calves. I'm sitting here bummed because my dairy goats did not kid for the SECOND time. Basically that means I've wasted an entire year (and feed...) trying to get them bred. Having your own milk supply is a beautiful thing; I hope I can know that someday for our own family.

    Keri Mae

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  9. Patrice: There was a guy at Texas A&M that conducted a class on making foods "shelf stable" many years ago. It appears he is still around. Check the link

    http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/foods/faq.shtm

    Go to item 21.

    The class is only conducted once per year. I will contact Dr. Wagner and see if we cannot get the next class taped and posted online.

    I took the class many years ago (Salsa!). It is some serious hard science. I'm sure it will be no problem for you.

    Despite my Longhorn credentials at UT-Austin, after living on my own farm for 10 years, the A&M sites are THE source for essential information on the farm front.

    For that matter, anything to do with bugs, dirt, critters, plants, food, and the blue sky above concerning Texas government is run out of A&M.

    In fact, I'd say they are one in the same when it comes to farm and food matters.

    charles in Texas.

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  10. Good Idea with the mustard. I do the bulk ketchup with no trouble. Also buy at costo the #10 size big cans of cheddar cheese and nacho, tomatoe sauce, olives,peaches and applesauce...then recan to appropriate sized jars using the same process. Nothing is worse than buying big and wasting the bottom half of the container from being opened.

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  11. You don't have to can the mustard. French's mustard will stay just fine in the cabinet for over a year after it's been opened. It doesn't have to be refrigerated.

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  12. Just made Guinness mustard as Christmas gifts for this year. No canning instructions were provided, just a 3 month refrigerator shelf life which left me wondering if Cannig would not provide a better result. i am so excited to try canning it for shelf stability. Just pressure canned for first time in my life this fall and i ready to try "canning the world" (my husband's words)thanks for the tips here! BTW, Saveur's website has the mustard recipe and it rocks! COuld not be easier for he homemade gift wow factor. Can't wait to try it this summer with brats. Ate some on toast this morning for breakfast.

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  13. Can you give the website for Saveur's?

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  14. I was wondering how these turned out after being on the shelf for a while. I just bought a 6 lb jar of mustard for $1.oo and would like to recan it.Thank You

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  15. Funny you should ask, we just opened a jar last week. The mustard is perfectly fine.

    One thing I recommend is when you heat the mustard prior to canning it, use a double boiler. I just used a big pot, and got a little bit of burned mustard on the bottom of the pot, bits of which made their way into the canned mustard. Next time I will nest two pots one inside the other double-boiler fashion to avoid that issue.

    Other than that, the mustard is perfectly fine.

    - Patrice

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  16. You could make your own from scratch and can it too...Found a link with 148 recipes all for mustard!
    http://www.melborponsti.com/inxmtd.html

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  17. new to canning here, and i stumbled upon your blog looking for an answer to my question: how long will the shelf life be after canning mustard? I plan on making a beer mustard and i got the recipe from williams sonoma website. And it says : "Use immediately or cover tightly and store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. " I would like to can the mustard and give it away for xmas. I just want to have a longer shelf life for them and not having to tell ppl they have one month to use. haha
    Please help! you seem to be an expert at this :)

    a million thanks.

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  18. Mind Esque-caper, if you properly can mustard it should last for several years. Happy canning!

    - Patrice

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  19. I tried canning some mustard today even though I stired the mustard in the jar before processing I got air pockets afterwards. did you have yhis happen?

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    1. I've never had an issue with air pockets even though everyone comments about them. They say if you slide a butter knife around the inside of the jars before capping, it helps reduce air bubbles; however as I said, they've just never been a problem for me (or perhaps, they've never bothered me -- not sure which).

      Either way, if you've processed them correctly and the jars sealed, I wouldn't worry about them.

      - Patrice

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  20. Thanks so much!
    Have you ever tried re canning juices?

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