Country Living Series

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Frugal living tips

Daisy Luther over at the Organic Prepper website had a great post recently called "30 frugal-living tips: Small changes that result in big savings."


Daisy's frugality advice echoes some of the suggestions I have in my ebooks "Plugging the Leaks" and "20 ways to cut your food bill."


What other good frugality tips can people offer?

14 comments:

  1. Get a vasectomy. That way you won't be paying for a kid for 18 years that will never have much to do with you and giving That Woman's subsequent boyfriends a free ride on your paycheck while you do without.---ken

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most people may have to start a little slower when making life changes. Stop drinking at Starbucks may be a better starting point.

      Delete
    2. Ah come on Ken, it isn't that bad. Euthanasia would solve a lot of problems too but it is the best choice?
      Montana Guy

      Delete
    3. Yes it is, even worse. If you get married your chances of staying married are about 50%. And just because you stay married doesn't indicate that you are happy. and over 80%of the divorces are initiated by the woman for no reason other than she is bored and wants someone new. These are facts. And now that being a single mom is a status symbol women get pregnant by claiming they are on the pill. We all see this. And being a single mom has great economic benefits for low achievers. Benefits that are paid by the entrapped father and by government programs. Strong marriages and strong families are a rarity now and you are lucky if you can get through life with that intact. And your economic and emotional future has better than even odds of being trashed. Norman Rockwell has passed on and more men than not have learned this too late.---ken

      Delete
  2. My best tip would be to not stop your frugal practices just because money's no longer tight. For example, I learned to make my own laundry detergent from an online recipe 8 years ago and I haven't stopped--why should I? It works just fine, and at 21 cents per gallon, you can bet I'm not going to switch to store-bought again! Calculating roughly, I figure I've saved $1000 since I started.

    On January 11 an article hit Yahoo 'News' titled: 'My Family is Surviving on Canned Spaghetti Because of the Government Shutdown.' Perhaps it was my years of practicing frugality, but it really drove home the realization that most Americans aren't prepared to weather any sort of deviation from their paycheck-to-almost-paycheck 'lifestyle.'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good grief. The MSM NEVER interviewed the coal miners' families about how they were surviving or what they were eating when Obama decided that coal was bad, electricity generated by coal was bad, and regulating it so that the mines and coal-fired generating stations closed down was good. Not one time did we EVER hear about the plight of coal miners. (The coal miners earned a lot more than some low-level nonessential government worker and were destroyed financially.)

      As for surviving on canned spaghetti, I don't suppose they ever priced a package of pasta and a jar of spaghetti sauce, or peanut butter and jelly and baking a loaf of bread, dried peas or beans, and a bag of cornmeal for cornbread.

      Delete
  3. Are Prostitutes better than normal women? Should men simply avoid dating and marriage and just pay money for sex with prostitutes? The following article explains why men should simply avoid normal women and ONLY have sex with prostitutes:

    https://www.elitefitness.com/forum/chat-amp-conversation/prostitutes-better-than-normal-women-1486144.html?viewfull=1#post18918642

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops! I'm sorry. I was looking for the Frugal Tips room.
      Montana Guy

      Delete
    2. Me thinks you could save even more with celibacy. The health risks alone outweigh any perceived benefits.

      Delete
  4. Agree with you on both counts. Canned spaghetti. I can do a lot with the price of canned spaghetti for a family of say four. The problem, IMHO, they don't plan more than one meal at a time. I took the hints from Amy Dacyczyn's Tightwad Gazette and shop to stock my pantry and then make my meals from that. Buying grocery items when they are on sale and having them on hand is a lot cheaper than planning a menu each week (or day) and just buying what you need for that.
    Kathy in ms

    ReplyDelete
  5. We use most of the more common tips but our biggest saver is making a yearly budget and sticking to it. This allows us to live beneath our fixed income (retired) and save for unexpected expenses. Like the year both our cars were hit due to people running stop lights/signs. We were able to get one repaired and replace the other from our savings.

    We each get a small "allowance" each month to spend any way we choose. Recently, my husband purchased a very cheap 4 wheeler and was able to fix it up with his money. I've purchased all my canning equipment, a dehydrator and a new freezer with mine.

    As my parents always told us, you really appreciate those things that you want badly enough to save to purchase. It's really true for us.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think an easy one is to try to live 5% or 10% under what you can. For many people, they will not notice the difference.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Stop using toilet paper and use earth's natural resources such as leaves, etc. Better yet, just forget the toilet and use the great outdoors and bury the deposits.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I try to simplify by using products that are not a one trick pony. I try to buy these things in bulk where possible...
    For cleaning I can clean everything from my dishes to my carpets to my car with:
    Blue Dawn
    Vinegar
    Sal Suds
    Odoban
    Bar Mop Towels from Sams

    For my pantry:
    Diced Tomatoes
    Rice
    Beans
    Spices
    Baking supplies

    ReplyDelete