Country Living Series

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Is college worth it?

Here's my WND column for this weekend entitled "Is College Worth It?"

13 comments:

  1. My recommendation to high school grads who want a college degree in a "concrete", non-liberal studies subject (Accounting, Business, Engineering & Computer Sciences, Information Technology and others) is to go on-line with a reputable college. Colorado Technical University is the one used by the military. My son got his Bachelor's in Accounting at CTU for approximately $30,000. That's about what you pay for 1 year at the nearest state university.

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  2. We have two in college, one to get a degree in nursing, the other to get a degree in English so she can go back to Korea (she served there in the Air Force) and be teacher. Both jobs require specific college degrees. Another of our children is a mechanic at a Honda dealership--he exceeded his financial goal last year and is on track to do the same this year. He makes really good money. Our two other sons are still trying to figure out what path to take to get to their goals of becoming a pilot, and the other a filmmaker. I think parents have a large part in the mess today. Why do they believe that college is the only path to a good paying job? Why do they encourage their children to take on such high debt? Why didn't they plan for and save for college from their child's birth if college was so important? And why do parents put up with the garbage that goes on at college? Sad, sad, sad.

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  3. As things stand right now, I'm strongly encouraging my kids to think about trade/technical school. I'd rather see them work their way up from the bottom than see them waste 4+ years and accrue a mountain of debt (all part of the plan) for what amounts to indoctrination and a piece of paper that says they are now fit to be taught to do something useful.

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  4. BEFORE you enter college you MUST do your homework and see what the job opportunities for what your considering and then look at the cost of where you are planning on attending. after you have done your home work then you can see IF it is financialy viable. Also look at the percent of grads that are hired as they graduate. Our son has three degree and NO college debt and was hired before he graduated and is now working in his field and loving his job, also he was hired at 100k a year. so DO YOUR HOMEWORK and see what is there, DO NOT get a no-name useless degree that goes nowhwere and you end up with a huge debt and NO-WAY to pay it back!! these easy to get college loans are for the most part BANKSTER SCAMS!! be smart and you can do it! also some colleges offer work at college and have lsits of summer jobs, take advantge, ALL of our sons friends and him who did the internships were HIRED at graduation and starting pay was all good!!

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  5. Short answer: ‘No!’ I'm with MC. College is necessary primarily for STEM areas of education.

    Few of today’s students will get a real job, no less one that actually REQUIRES the knowledge and skills learned at college.

    If I were young today I’d take a hard look at learning a trade, finding a mentor, with the ultimate goal of owning my own very small business. If you don’t think there are ideal niche opportunities, try building a house.

    Montana Guy

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  6. Patrice, I've been trying unsuccessfully to contact you to see if you and your husband are still making wooden beer steins. I stumbled across an article a few weeks ago but haven't been able to figure out how to contact you. Are you still in that business? Thanks, Kurt

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    1. Hi Kurt: Actually we just -- as in JUST -- closed the doors of the tankard business after 24 years of nonstop production. It's been a long and satisfying journey, but we've decided to move onto other things. We're just about to send out our final order before putting our tools to rest.

      - Patrice

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    2. Any way to sneak in under the wire and place a person order? If not, do you have a recommendation for someone else who's work you admire?

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    3. You might try Joe Victor at Goodly Woods (www.goodlywoods.com) -- an incredibly talented fellow, and darned nice as well.

      - Patrice

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  7. Patrice, I've been trying to unsuccessfully contact you after coming across an article several weeks ago about the beer steins you and your husband make and sell. Are you still in that business? If so, how can I contact you about placing an order? Thanks!! Sorry to hijack this blog but I'm all out of other options.....

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  8. Students in high school should be tested for what they are good at and if they would need a degree for their life work. A Japanese friend of mine told me that's was how it was done in her time in Japan. You were either a college bound student or a trade school student. That was that. For example her sister was sorted out for trade school, she took up sewing. For example a sewn button was to be learned in over a month to get it right. She learned from her sister, she is an amazing seamstress. Anyhow, we are not all made for college, we all have to express whatever gift God has given us and work on that. It would be better to have a job that makes us super happy over a good paying job that has shown us only misery.

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    1. That is how things used to be done when I was a child in Indiana. Kids were given an IQ test in third grade, then separated into different tracks. 1978 was the last year they did so, however, presumably because it wasn't "fair" to children who wanted to aspire to something more.

      These days I advise college freshmen who come in with 250 on their SAT verbal and tell me they want to be a doctor, veterinarian, nurse, etc. Many flounder for a few semesters, fail a few courses, and eventually have to drop out (or, more often, flunk out) because they can't handle the material. Our college lets them do this because apparently the SAT is "just one test" and we "have to give everyone a chance." The only thing this "chance" gives these kids is a big whacking tuition bill they have to pay off with the handfuls of nickels left over from their fast food jobs.

      I have a lot of uncomfortable conversations with these students, and, happily, 25 percent of them change their majors in the first semester to something they actually have a talent in or motivation for.

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  9. When I was just out of college the first time, I worked for a guy who had four sons. He wasn't saving to pay for their college education. Instead, he was buying each of them a house for their high school graduation present. He didn't finance the house, he gave each son a mortgage free house. Even then, I remember thinking how smart he was and how I wish my parents had given me that gift.

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