Country Living Series

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Learning to use a can opener

Here's my WND column for this weekend entitled "Hey Millennials! Learn to use a can opener!"


Be sure to watch the videos. You've probably seen the hilarious one at the bottom already; but the top video is ... well, sad.

10 comments:

  1. Fortunately there are a number of food items that now come in 'pop top' cans.
    When 1st daughter was in college she attended a cookout where everyone was in a panic because the person sent to buy the chicken bought whole chickens instead of pieces. No one there new how to cut up a chicken! So daughter took a knife and did the job. Saved the day! All because she grew up on a farm where chicken dressing was done by the whole family! And she called to thank me.

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  2. I was browsing in an antique store one day when a teenage girl came in the store and asked to borrow a can opener so she and her friend could have some soup. (Her mother left her at the store next door while she ran some errands) About 10 minutes later she returned to the antique store with the old manual crank can opener and a can of soup asking how to open the can. She and her friend couldn't figure it out. I'm amazed these kids don't starve to death!

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  3. I enjoy your view on the world very much, and the winter pic in your heading is outstanding.
    I agree with you completely regarding the "younger" generation not actually being able to function. Very recently I was in a grocer and the high school kid simply was baffled at how to make change. Bill was $12.31 - gave him a $20 and .31 cents. he simply could not figure it out,(cause he punched into the register $20.45{where he got that is anybody's guess}) he asked an older woman next to him, she produced a calculator and still he could not figure it out. Quite simply technology has produced tools to make mundane things we do simpler and less time consuming, but that has brought out the ability to cease to think. I have run across people in their 40's or older and I often wonder how they dress themselves in the morning. It is a sad state we have allowed our society to digress to. Not being able to do simple math is just disgusting. I for one am a proponent of keepng the old school ways alive. When the power goes out, as it most assuredly will at some point, for whatever reason, for any length of time, what then? Me thinks that if you cannot function without your "app" or whatever on your stupid phone or whatever it is you carry your personality around in. You are not a human being, merely a waste of clean air and producer of carbon dioxide(which plants love) and pretty much useless as a productive member of the human race.... But what do I know, I actually use my brain to troubleshoot broken stuff for a living....

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    1. I have one better for you. I went to a yard sale where everything was priced at .25, .50, and .75 each. So I picked up a bunch of items and showed them to the young college age student. Folks I am not making this up, she could not add them up. I had to show her how. This was a yard sale so that she and her other college student friends could get a little extra money. Don't they have math 101 in college. I felt like Einstein next to them.

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    2. All 3 of our daughters went to college, but BEFORE they went, we taught them how to do the many things that are never taught in schools anymore. We started with each of them when they were very young. However, I remember that making change was a requirement for each of them in school. Our youngest just didn't want to be bothered with it, but we (her mother and I) insisted! Two of our girls have bachelor degrees and one has a masters degree in anthropology. The one with the masters degree has done about everything and anything you can think of, including being a truck driver, a care-taker for handicapped and crippled children and grown-ups, and when she was still in high school she taught herself how to play the flute, piccolo, piano and trombone. On top of that, she was the drum major in the marching band AND a terrific tennis player! People just can't believe how talented she is, but it really wasn't difficult. Our other two girls are a super artist and an outstanding journalist, and all we did was WORK with them, instead of sitting on our tushes watching TV and telling them to "go play"! --Fred in AZ

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  4. It is too late. You can't fix stupid.

    If this old coot could pass on anything to parents it would be, 'The two greatest gifts parents can give to their children are Jesus Christ and schooling at home'.

    Montana Guy

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  5. I'm feeling arrogant and self-congratulatory this morning.

    I'm reading this while my 7-year-old daughter puts a kettle of water on the stove to boil and pours herself a bowl of cereal.

    Before I think I'm too hot of stuff as a mother...

    ...she's boiling the water to make Top Ramen, and I will probably pour the milk for her. It's a full gallon. She can clean up the spill, but the waste really gets my goat.

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    1. I'm right there with you! =) My 8 and 6 yo boys can use old fashioned can openers. Even my 4 yo girl can get it started, but isn't strong enough to get the can opened. But, I'm not sure they would know what to do after it's opened... They can all get their own cereal, too... and the milk doesn't get spilled all the time! lol (I can't stand wasting food either.)
      Keep up the good work! Mothers who teach their children useful life skills are so very important (even if your daughter is making ramen)! =)

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    2. One of the best things we ever did was to buy a small (nonbreakable!) pitcher for the fridge. The smaller kids can then pour their own milk. :)

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  6. if they can't figure out a can opener, what are they going to do with a veggie peeler and a potato?? or a filet knife and a fresh caught fish?? if they can figure out how to catch a fish.

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