Country Living Series

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Why I'll never go back to California

Here's my WND column for this weekend entitled Why I'll Never Go Back to California.

19 comments:

  1. I hope they don't succeed in getting the rest of the country to follow them!

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  2. I agree with you Patrice, I left Cal for a state with more conservative views and have never looked back. I miss my family and hope at some point that they will wake up and join me. The people in my area that have also relocated from the Golden State have the same values and do not want to see Arizona become like the state we left. I wish the same could be said of those relocating to the larger cities here, Phoenix and Tucson. I feel that our rural area will remain the way it is for some time to come as the Liberals do not find it an attractive place to live. They do not like free range and many people exercising their right to open carry, not to mention all those that carry concealed.No permit for either open or concealed required. We still have town meetings, no 7/11s or fast food , or that matter, no name brand stores. Churches out number Business, I have found my paradise. Dee, in the South West

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    1. My wife and I also moved from CA to Arizona, 14 years ago. We're out in the boonies on 20 isolated acres and we love it! Everything is cheaper here! Not long after we moved here, my wife asked some cops in town what she should do with her pistol when she goes into her work. Should she leave it on the seat unloaded? They told her not to do that, because someone might break into her car to steal it. They told her to put it under the seat or in her glovebox! Can you imagine? In CA the cops would have arrested her on the spot!

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  3. This made me smile: California imposes a level of control on its citizens that boggles the mind. Try starting a business. Or purchasing a firearm (don’t even think about getting a concealed carry). Or homeschooling your kids. Or renovating (much less building) a house. I know a fellow who was required to get a city permit merely to paint his bathroom.

    My mom did successfully home school her children in California, with us receiving our diplomas at 15 or 16 years old.

    My dad did start a business in California and it remain successful with him taking annual European trips with his girlfriend. Obviously we don't share similar lifestyles or goals.

    My parents built a house and when they divorced it sold for double the cost and net a profit of more than 7 figures.

    But I also saw how much hassle and red tape they had to deal with. My mom had to "hide" under umbrella schools and ISPs to home school us. They had to get a permit for everything in building the house. They had permission to move 2500 cubit feet of dirt so they could have a 3 foot flat spot around the house before it dropped down the hillside... in reality, 25,000 cubit feet was moved and they had a decent patio space with a slip for a hot tub. You don't want to know the headaches they got from building a steel frame house instead of wood frame. At the time, only 4 other houses in California were steel frame, so there was no agreeable standards.

    I still happily left all that behind when I got married and have never looked back. Tried to make the southwest home, but alas... I'm a cold loving girl. Made the move north 6 months ago and have never been more content with my location. :)

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  4. I am one of those trapped people. I have lived in CA my entire life and can't wait to get the h**** out of here. My rural life style has been ruined by the march of the developers. The people moving into the new homes expect those of us with livestock to adapt to them, not the other way around (Gee I moved here for the small town rural lifestyle but the smell and the flies. and your rooster makes too much noise. Pigs? What do you mean that my child can't play in that pasture? Your cows chased my son so you need to do something about it and on and on and on) And guns....well lets just say that when your neighbor looks over the fence and sees your husband cleaning his firearms after a day at the range and CALLS the police, and they respond in force, its time to move. (FYI my husband is a police officer and was cleaning his duty gun in the backyard!!!)

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    1. Sounds like where I live. People who bought in new developments a few years ago managed to run an ostrich farmer off of his land. He had been there over 20 years.

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    2. This is what we can expect when liberal-progressives are running the government. Nothing will ever make sense again. Expecting a fair trial in a court of law will never happen unless you know somebody. We will be taxed until we have nothing left to give them and then stripped of all our rights and freedoms. And these crooks are in BOTH of our major parties. They are called "progressive Republicans" but I just call them "RINOs". (Republican In Name Only.)

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  5. I grew up in a sma;; faring community in central Ohio. In the early to mid 70s I designed fire trucks for a small company (I was the entire engineering department.) We did four truks going to Albuquerque and the customer wanted "on wheels" delivery to give them a good shakedown. Not ever having been west of Chicago, I volunteered to drive one of the trucks.

    I fell in love with the Southwest, and in the late 70s a friend and I went on a raod trip that took us through Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and eventually ending up in Anaheim where we had some friends.

    I remember my first impression when we stopped early in the morning at a gas station on the division between "desert" and "city." We drove for what seemed for hours seeing nothing but concrete. I thought, "How can people STAND to live here? The time was otherwise pleasant, spent with our friends and seeing a few of the sights, but I was glad to leave.

    I had a similar experience years later when the company I was working for (at that time) was moving their engineering department to a sister company north of Chicago. Those of us who were going to be offered relocation were put on a commuter flight and flown to O'Hare where we were put on buses that took us to a hotel. Flying over Chicago in this small plane at night, I could see the lights of the city from horizon, to horizon, to hoprizon, to horizon. Again, my thought was, "How can anyone stand it here?"

    I didn't accept the relocation, and eventually moved to south central Michigan. Our current town is about the size of our home in Ohio, but without the sense of community. We are presently looking for a place out of the city.

    The more I see the news out of thwe big cities, and follow the reports of the draconian laws being passed in those location, with - as you pointed out - California leading the charge, I fail to see how anyone would willingly subject themselves to such a restriction on their freedoms. I have long mused - and some pundit has finally pointed it out - how today's politicians enactiong laws that continue to nibble away at our freedoms are the very same people who, in the 60s and 70s, demanded that the government leave them alone, that they were free moral agents.

    What a difference a taste of power can make.

    Steve Herr

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    1. Many of us don't "willingly" subject ourselves to such restrictions of our liberties. We fight and complain and write letters and e-mails and make phone calls. We're told to "obey the law" or we'll be fined and/or thrown in jail! We stopped voting for Republicrats long ago. We only vote independent now.

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  6. I have to agree. No state is perfect but...wow...California is off the charts. We relocated to Arizona also, in a teenie town and we love it. Not as crazy as the west coast by a long shot.

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  7. As a third generation California I would leave in a heartbeat but for one thing...my mom and sisters aren't believers and I feel I would be throwing them to the wolves if I was to leave. The spiritual matter is more important than anything else. The best thing you can do as an adult is leave the moment you can...raise your children away from here. Yes the politicians don't get it at all but there is a growing movement in Central California of like minded believers that can't leave but are learning as much as we can for self sufficiency. That may be an oxymoron in California but we are doing the best we can to make a difference. Although we vote, it is meaningless but each person that we can pull toward being prepared and opening their eyes to how desperate this situation is rewarding. God is sovereign and all we can do is work within the area He has placed us. If it was my choice I would be in Idaho but his ways are not mine. Thank you for teaching us so much Patrice. Remember there are lots of us faithful still here in California.

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  8. I would leave in a hot minute if I could find a job and dump my house. Because of the housing boom, then bust, after 15 years, we are underwater on our mortgage. Silly us, we are still faithfully making our payments and honoring our commitments, even though several people in the area bought homes they could not afford, and then bailed when it wasn't sustainable.

    I am seeking work in other states in hopes that one day we might be able to escape this loony bin.

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  9. Why stay in California? Well when you live in the rare county that is rural and conservative it isn't a bad place to live. Yet sadly it couldn't last forever.
    Why stay in California? I'm one year from retirement. I can't afford to retire here but it will be a good retirement in another state.
    One can get a CCW in California. It depends in what county you live in. I have one.
    Homeschooling in California has been easy for us and several others in our area. I'm not sure why people say you can't. Than again, maybe it is the county I live in.

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    1. I agree, it has to be the county you live in, we live in Northern California. My husband and I recently received our CCW without any problem, in fact they sheriff's dept. was all too happy to give them to us. Home schooling not a problem here, know several families that do so and don't have their children registered with county schools or other government programs. We have had people move into the area and complain about the farming, but they soon learn to shut up and keep to themselves or leave.

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    2. I live in Northern California...My grandchildren are 7th generation. I love it here. We farm and live a wonderful life. I have traveled all over the the USA and the world...I am in a financial position where I could live anywhere...I will always call Northern California home.

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  10. I grew up 22 years in Michigan. Graduated college, nowhere to go, so I joined my dad & sister in California to "get my feet under me". Met my wonderful husband (whose mom was a Michigan gal) and got stuck for 15 years in that state.

    Our son has autism. His teacher's aide pulled us aside and let us know that our school district was planning on 35 kids to 1 teacher, 1 aid for special ed. We put the house up for sale, sold it before the property bust and moved practically sight unseen to rural PA in 2008.

    BEST thing we ever did. We miss most of the family we left behind, but can't understand why anyone would stay (and why our nieces & nephews are being subjected to the schools there). None of even want to visit the state anymore. My 13 yo daughter visited last summer and said "good place to visit, I don't want to live there anymore!"

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  11. hi.
    some years ago was told by a friend that she had visited a homeless shelter in san fran on a trip west.
    met a lady living there who earned 50,000$ per annum as a legal secretary.
    i would love to bring in that kind of cash, which is a fortune to me but this lady couldn't even afford an efficiency apt. on that kind of money there!
    a real shocker.
    there is definitely something terribly wrong out there.
    deb h.

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  12. The West has changed flags many times. The next change nears.
    Folks might want to adjust accordingly.
    Montana Guy

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  13. If it were possible to go now we would. I am looking for a new property similar to what we have now only in a different state. It is almost a carbon copy of what you have except yours is still green for the cattle.
    We like our neighbors but we are being crowded out, and I am a person who needs space.
    Then you have the pot growers who come in an buy the land to plant their crops at your back door. If I had wanted to smell a morgue I would live next to one. It stinks!!
    They have no respect for the land or those who live near by when they move in, so the quicker we can resolve health issues. We are gone.

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