Country Living Series

Saturday, December 14, 2013

The last literate generation?

Here's my WND column for this weekend entitled The Last Literate Generation?

10 comments:

  1. I have found that to be so with books versus movies!
    Books are so much more interesting giving more detail most of all truth was brought out in the book!

    ReplyDelete
  2. As usual, you are so correct. I am currently substitute teaching after working almost eight years in an independent study charter school that was designed for kids who needed to make up credits. I have worked with hundreds of students in middle and high school that can't read aloud, comprehend what they have read, or write a decent report. Teachers have to move quite fast because they have to "teach to the test" which means they can't slow down for students who need extra help.

    I see many reasons for this, but I should probably keep my opinion to myself. I hold views that are completely opposite of those who control education. I will say that I totally support home schooling, and other alternatives to "cookie cutter" education. The way education is in America, and how it will be with common core (that upcoming "fix"), is a failure. But then again, isn't that the goal?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello Patrice. Great article as usual. It annoys me to no end when people young and old, text with such bad/poor grammar. Incomplete sentences and not knowing the difference between no, know, there, their, etc. as you pointed out. I am so grateful that I was raised in the 60's and attended Catholic schools for the first eight years of my life. The nuns were big on writing and grammar. We always had to read aloud and I took such pride in reading while pausing after the comma, and stopping briefly after the period, etc. Even after graduating from a Detroit public school, I had a good foundation and never forgot the good habits I learned in elementary and middle school. My dad went to the 8th grade and my mom to the 3rd grade. The only book I remember seeing was a large Bible; that we never read..lol...My dad had a small collection of Spanish history books; which we also never read. We lived directly across the street from a small Catholic school, so they thought it was convenient to send us there. It was those years with the nuns that taught me the love for reading and writing. When I had my daughter I bought her books before toys and she learned to read at a very young age. I read to her regular bedtime stories and at 29 years old, she's an avid reader and a very good writer. I'm also an avid reader and so glad that aside from my Kindle Fire, I also enjoy hard cover books that always look so nice on shelves and with the years become classics. I feel so bad for this young generation that has doesn't have the teachers that I was blessed to have, that strongly encouraged reading and writing skills. If I had to do it over again, I definitely would have home schooled. Your daughters are so blessed to have you and Don for parents. I look forward to reading all your great and interesting articles. Stay warm and be blessed. Alicia

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm not one to point the finger, but the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. If the parents don't help teach and encourage it, then it won't stick.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am so sad that this is true. I come from a long line of avid readers , and bought and read especially good and beautiful books to my girls, one who only began to be able to read at 14 aloud , but still can not comprehend any of it . The other is an honor student who claims to be a reader , that would be 4-6 romance novels a year...I was working my way through Dickens on my own at age 12.....but now I even struggle to read anything of much depth , I wonder if our easy access of Information keeps us from gaining any real knowledge somehow.Karen

    ReplyDelete
  6. As one who does work in the public school system, I am proud to say that our students are not allowed to read any book that has been made into a movie, nor do book reports or essays on them. I have had a few students who have said they have never seen the movie, however the reply has always been no, can not read it, would not be fair to the other students to see you reading a book that has been a movie just because you have not seen it, yet.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Patrice,

    I have read your blog and WND articles for a while now and I enjoy them a lot, but I must say this has to be one of my absolute favorite pieces you have ever written!

    As a father of 2 young children this is an issue near and dear to my heart. I am an extremely avid reader personally but I feel like I am fighting an uphill battle to make sure my children read and love books as much as I do.

    The reasons you cited for the importance of reading; debating, writing, comprehending and thinking critically are dead on.

    I remember a stat one of my professors passed along in college to us. He said that 95% of the books were read by 35% of the people, which conversely means that 65% of the population only read the other 5% of books! I have never been able to verify this stat anywhere, but if it is true that is a very sad commentary on our population.

    ReplyDelete
  8. My family has always been full of avid readers. My teenaged granddaughters read all the time. They have the problem of not been able to read the "teen" books as they have unsuitable content (adultery, incest, etc Try V.C Andrews if you don't believe me.) so are into the adult classics and history books. Their friends seldom read and think the girls are strange.

    ReplyDelete
  9. If you check out Abebooks, you'll find that the best -- i.e. classic -- books are 'free': many of them cost a buck, plus the cost of postage; most are under five bucks. This is wonderful for anyone who loves to read. But of course it really means that no one but oddballs (anyone who loves to read) is buying them.... Even public libraries have deaccessed classics. The shelves are filled with books that would have been considered pornographic or pruriently violent even fifty years ago. What does this say about us as a society? I've read that lion trainers masturbate the animals to make them docile. What, again, does this say about 'us' as a society?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Today, most people do not think. They are unable to process information, think clearly or creatively, and do not understand the importance of being an autodidact or self sufficient. While our society considers thinking out of the box a good thing, the reality is when someone demonstrate this skill, they are shunned.

    To me, reading a steady diet of fiction is the same as a steady diet of cake and candy. I much prefer non fiction on a rather wide variety of topics. I purchase more non-fiction used books than I will admit to. We have had a room dedicated as a library for many years, today, my grandchildren gravitate to my library shelves when they visit. I have a large collection of KJV Bibles. I prefer Cambridge, even the dwarsliggar format. Since my youth I have the ubiquitous pile of books near or on my bed as well as the Bible under my pillow.

    Yes. Books are important. But what about being a Polymath? Not only are we an illiterate society, but we are an increasingly de-skilled society.

    ReplyDelete