Country Living Series

Saturday, November 26, 2011

More black Friday stuff

I used the Black Friday theme to write this weekend's WorldNetDaily column entitled The Greedy Wolf at America's Door. (It was originally entitled simply The Wolf at the Door.)

5 comments:

  1. We couldn't agree more with everything you said in your column, Patrice. My wife and I have felt the same way about "Black Friday" for as long as they've been doing it. If you want to see folks at their very lowest, the way they act on Black Friday is a perfect example. We avoid them and all the stores that cater to them like the plague. I can't help wondering: Maybe if stores would lower their costs ALL YEAR ROUND, their sales would be better and they wouldn't have to stoop to such tactics as Black Friday? Just a thought. --Fred & Deb in AZ

    ReplyDelete
  2. amen to that! i do not do "black friday" ever...just seeing the reports on tv about it makes me feel embarrassed and ashamed of it all. you are right..the day is gonna come w hen these folks are gonna wish they had shown better sense with spending their time and hard earned money.

    ReplyDelete
  3. We never do Black Friday and I've never seen the point to going out and fighting the crowds over something you can pick up later without the long lines and frantic people. The commercialism makes me sick...how can people afford to shop like that in this day and time?

    ReplyDelete
  4. There seems to be some disagreement about where the term "Black Friday" came from.

    I always understood it to be the first day of the year that retail stores were finally operating "In the Black" - making a profit for the year. Until then, they were operating "In the Red," or at a loss.

    In the old fashioned, pen-driven, accounting world, red ink = loss and black ink = profit.

    Am I the only one who remembers this? I'm not hearing this anywhere anymore.

    Just Me

    ReplyDelete
  5. (waving arm wildly in the air) Ooh! Ooh! I knew that! Truly I did!

    The sad part is, the term "Black Friday" has come to mean something far more sinister.

    - Patrice

    ReplyDelete