Country Living Series

Thursday, August 25, 2011

“Instead of remedying the problem, the regulations make it that much harder.”

Many years ago I lived in Davis, California and worked in West Sacramento, about 15 miles away. The drive took me over a long causeway which crossed an area that frequently flooded in the wet winters and dried out in summer. Sometimes winters weren't wet enough to flood, but the area was marshy. Needless to say, there were no buildings on this massive stretch of land.

Oftentimes I saw hispanic goatherders or sheepherders who spent the summer grazing their flocks on the abundant grasses and weeds. It was pleasant to see the land being put to use. The shepherds had little dome-roofed caravans they would park in the shade of the causeway. Their companions were herding dogs which were superbly trained. They were solitary fellows, but always seemed friendly and would return a wave.

This morning my brother sent me an article about some new regulations put in place by the federal government regarding working conditions for herders. Please please, someone tell me where in the constitution does the federal government have the right to tell employers what kinds of conditions they must provide for herders?? We're not talking state government, or county, or city. We're talking the feds.

"These new special procedures issued by the Labor Department must be followed by employers who want to hire temporary agricultural foreign workers to perform sheep herding or goat herding activities. It describes strict rules for sleeping quarters, lighting, food storage, bathing, laundry, cooking and new rules for the counters where food is prepared."

Under the Obama Administration, "the nanny state has imposed 75 new major regulations with annual costs of $38 billion."

“This captures what is wrong with government,” said Diane Katz, a research fellow in regulatory policy at The Heritage Foundation. “I could not have made this up.”

Let me get this straight. Herding animals has been a respectable form of employment for, oh, about five thousand years, possibly more. And now suddenly in 2012 we need "strict rules" for food counters and ventilation.

And people wonder why our country is going to heck in a handbasket with high unemployment and businesses closing. As Ms. Katz points out, instead of fixing a problem (that never needed fixing!), these stupid regulations make it that much harder to employ herders.

Congratulations Labor Department, you've done it again.

13 comments:

  1. This has got to be the silliest thing I have ever heard of and thats saying something cause I live in Illinois. Don't herders stay outside with their flocks for days on end. Maybe they are supposed to carry a washing machine up the mountain. Thjat would take one heck of an extention cord.

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  2. More garbage regulation that the farmer cannot afford. This is just one more example of the reason we will all be eating Corporate Conglomerate, government approved, mass produced and processed food if the government keeps interfering with the small farmers. Just keep pushing those very costly regulations down their throats and they will eventually all have to fold. The profit margin for herders is slim to begin with. The profits for small herders just got erased with this added regulation, unless the farmer reverts back to doing ALL the work himself.
    How does this help create jobs for others?
    All Regulatory interference is costly and helping to kill this country's economy.
    Even the herders that can upfront afford to accommodate these additional costs, don't you know those increase in operating costs will just have to be passed on to the consumers in the end price for goats?
    Sure, the regulators know that.
    They're actually counting on that.

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  3. Too many bureaucrats with too much time on their hands. How do they come up with this crap!
    Kay

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  4. Do the costs of this nanny-madness exceed the entire flocking herd economy?

    God help us.

    November 2012 can't come too soon.


    A. McSp

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  5. Patrice,
    Missed your posts and so happy you are safely home.
    How is the barn project going?
    pixs please.


    notutopia

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  6. Where this new regulation will have the biggest impact is in Northern Nevada and Wyoming, where there are many sheepherders and few towns around for supplies.

    The US govt has been harassing farmers and ranchers for decades. This is most often brought about in the form of EPA regulations and under the guise of "health & safety". From destroying dams in the West (so farmers can't irrigate their crops) to this new stupidity, we are losing our ability to grow our own foods and meats. This is part of the progressives' plan.

    Obama isn't just interested in redistributing the "wealth" between Americans. Oh no, he wants to redistribute our "wealth" to other countries. If we can't grow enough of our own food due to all the regulations, we'll have to import it and thereby improve the living standards of those who grow it in other countries.

    If Americans don't stop believing all the baloney they hear from the do-gooders and the progressives, this country is not going to survive. That is the plain truth.

    On the other end of the foreign worker spectrum is this interesting article. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/19/opinion/not-the-america-they-expected.html?_r=1 My response to these lazy brats is to kick them back home. Americans need the jobs, and Obama shouldn't be giving work to foreigners when our own people need them.

    Anonymous Patriot
    USA

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  7. Yes, how is Jet too?

    sheilab15

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  8. Just how far in it's interpretation does this new regulation go?
    Does this mean that I have to apply nasty formica on top of my lovely hand rubbed, wooden counter tops in order to cook a meal in my own farm kitchen? Countertops that are used to prep and cook meals for all of us, including my temp farm hands too.
    What are the limits to these regulations?
    Are they going to come into my house and require me to be a "licensed kitchen" if I am the one who cooks and serves the same meals we all eat?
    When will this confounded invasive interference stop?

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  9. You should check out the USDA's regs regarding how to handle a milk spill, a "hazardous chemical". I'd love to see that in action.

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  10. just wait until you read the regualtion proposed by the obama administration on operating farm ecquipment like tractors and bailers, and harvestors....the gov. wants all us who own and operate these to have commercial liscenses etc...like overroad truck drivers. yep, its coming unless we do something about it.the feds are finding ways to worm their way into everything we do..regulating so much that we might as well give up...well, i think that is what they hope we will do.not here...i dare them to stand in front of my tractor when i have it running.

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  11. We are about to lose an irrigation dam created in the late 1800-early 1900's cause the farmers dammed up a a creek and spring and enlarged it. It's a great place for seeing migratory birds. Now the birds are more important than the farmers and recreation. If Deer Flat was returned to it's natural state there would be a hell of a lot less wildlife.
    At this point I'd just like to see folks shut down power plants, dams and irrigation because the idiots in DC and all the mother Earth worshiping fools will not wake up until it hits them in the pocket book.
    Sorry I'm just so frustrated and our congress critters won't do a thing about it.

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  12. Maybe this will be the new sheepherder's wagon? I like it!!

    http://www.cowboycampoutfitters.com/wagon.html


    -A.P.

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  13. Gee, Mrs. Lewis, you wouldn't want Obama to be added to the unemployment rolls now would ya! How about all of those fed workers that might have to find a real job! I wonder how many will become farmers?

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